Clinical Research

Excerpt of an article published in The Huffington Post with first-hand accounts of how sequestration is impacting scientific research.

When The Huffington Post published an in-depth look at how budget cuts were affecting scientific research, we encouraged readers to offer reactions and share personal experiences.

Excerpt of an op-ed by columnist George F. Will, published in The Washington Post.

’€œThe capacity to blunder slightly is the real marvel of DNA. Without this special attribute, we would still be anaerobic bacteria and there would be no music.’€

By Tyler Wiechman

Wiechman currently works in the cardiovascular specialty of a privately owned pharmaceutical company working with specialists and hospitals in the Central Pennsylvania Region.  He withdrew from a PhD in biomedical sciences from the Penn State University Hershey College of Medicine and received his BS in Psychology from the University of Delaware in 2011. He has worked for three different labs focusing on Neurological/Psychological health and behavior. 

Low Percentage Hear About Clinical Trials from Health Care Providers

TMJ AssociationThe TMJ Association, Ltd. (TMJA), a Research!America member, was founded in 1989 in Milwaukee, WI by two TMJ patients. The organization’€™s mission is to improve the quality of health care and lives of everyone affected by Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD), commonly called TMJ.

Dear Research Advocate:

Yesterday, I joined Diane Rehm and other guests on her nationally syndicated radio program to discuss how sequestration impacts “ordinary Americans.” I was struck by how deep and distressing the damage is, in so many sectors, including but not limited to our own. Yet somehow the pain is not acute enough to force action.

By Olivera J. Finn and Robert E. Schoen

Dear Research Advocate:

Only Small Percentage say Health Care Professionals Have Ever Talked to Them about Medical Research

Multiple sclerosis, or MS, is a neurological disorder that is a leading cause of disability in young adults. May 29 is World MS Day; started in 2009, it is a global campaign to raise awareness of MS which affects more than 2 million people world-wide and an estimated 400,000 Americans. There is no cure for MS and current therapies have only limited benefits to slow disease progression. Learn more about MS on Research!America’€™s fact sheet.

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