We NEED CURES, NOT CUTS. Sequestration arbitrarily stifles federal investment in national priorities like medical research and innovation, at the expense of America and Americans. Deficit reduction is important, but there are ways to achieve it that do not set out nation back, threatening our global leadership and shortchanging the health and safety of the American people. Tell Congress: WE NEED CURES, NOT CUTS!
Dear Research Advocate: The goal of the 21st Century Cures Initiative, launched last May by House Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI-06) and Ranking Member of the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee Diana DeGette (D-CO-01), is passage of legislation in 2015 that will eliminate obstacles to faster medical progress. (Representatives Upton and DeGette spoke to a packed audience at FasterCures “Partnering for Cures” meeting in New York on Monday, explaining their goals. Check this out , being sure to listen to the personal story of determination told by Sonia Vallabh; she and her husband have changed their careers to help find a cure for fatal familial insomnia.) It is exciting...
Excerpt of an op-ed published in The Hill by Research!America Board member E. Albert Reece , M.D., Ph.D., MBA, VP of medical affairs at the University of Maryland, the John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor and dean of the School of Medicine; and Paul B. Rothman , M.D., Frances Watt Baker, M.D. and Lenox D. Baker Jr., M.D. Dean of the Medical Faculty, VP of medicine at Johns Hopkins University and CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine. With the midterm elections now behind us, we could not help but notice that one crucial policy issue was not considered in a serious or thoughtful way on the campaign trail: today’€™s woeful funding shortfalls in science. The American research enterprise...
Find out what your 2014 Candidates will do in Congress to support medical research With less than a month remaining before Election Day, now is the time to get involved in the Ask Your Candidates! initiative. Through this effort, voters can ask congressional candidates to share their views on accelerating medical progress in America. Every voice makes a difference as we look to find treatments and cures for deadly and disabling diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’€™s, and other threats like Ebola. There are two easy ways to participate: Send an email to your candidates using the pre-drafted message, or a message of your own, and by filling in your contact information and clicking ’€œSend...
Dear Research Advocate: News of the rising death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has captured attention in the U.S. With the arrival of two American patients for treatment in Atlanta earlier this week, we are reminded of our truly global society and the importance of a nimble research ecosystem. Complex global disease threats exemplify the importance of both the public and private sectors in protecting our health. Why, then, are we not fully funding the NIH, CDC and FDA to ensure the robust public health infrastructure needed to respond to population-wide threats, to pursue vaccine development and other prevention strategies, and to develop new treatment options for Ebola and a...
Dear Research Advocate: We are finally seeing action to address the surfeit of regulations placed on the research community. Accountability is essential, but it isn’€™t a function of how thick the red tape is! The Research and Development Efficiency Act, HR 5056 , passed the House this week and is pending before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. This is but one example of the direct effect that your legislators can have on medical research. Do you know what your candidates will do to advance medical progress if elected on November 4th? Our Ask Your Candidates! national voter education initiative highlights the views of candidates. We are counting on you to help...
Dear Research Advocate: Research!America board member and co-chair of One Mind, Patrick Kennedy, and the head of neuroscience research at Janssen Research & Development, Husseini Manji, shared their perspectives on the state of neurological and mental health research and treatment in a USA Today op-ed . As Kennedy and Manji remind us, a quarter of our population experience mental illness, but nearly 60% of those individuals do not receive any treatment. Federal funding for medical and health research is crucial to improving diagnosis and treatment, and developing cures for patients who suffer from mental illness, Parkinson’€™s, Alzheimer’€™s and a whole range of other diseases. But time...
Dear Research Advocate: ’€œNever a dull moment’€ is how one advocate described this year’€™s appropriations cycle as Chairwoman Mikulski, Chairman Rogers, and other key appropriators try every which way to restore some semblance of regular order to the process. The Senate Labor-H bill, which allocates funding for NIH, CDC and AHRQ and was originally scheduled for full committee mark-up on June 12, has been postponed indefinitely. The House has passed a Commerce-Science-Justice (CJS) bill containing a healthy increase (3.2%) in NSF funding, but the House Agriculture bill, which includes a net reduction in FDA funding when new responsibilities are taken into account, was postponed in the...
Dear Research Advocate: Research!America Chairman, former Congressman John Edward Porter, and Board Member Kweise Mfume, also a former Member of Congress, published a timely op-ed in The Hill on taking action now ’€” not next year or five years down the road ’€” to accelerate medical progress. A misconception about federally funded medical research is that its benefits won’€™t surface for decades. In fact, research is a relay race, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) supports several legs of it. At this very moment, some NIH-funded researchers are engaging in initial exploration, while others are further along, readying discoveries for the private sector to take and run with. And...
Dear Research Advocate: For every step forward in the appropriations process, there tends to be a stumble backwards. The House has begun floor debate on HR 4660 , the Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2015 . The bill calls for a $237 million increase over FY 14 for the National Science Foundation (NSF), totaling $7.4 billion in budget authority. This increase (approximately 3%) is $150 million higher than the figure included in the President’€™s budget (a higher level that the President has endorsed) and is emblematic of the priority that should also be assigned to funding for the National Institutes of Health and our nation’€™s other research agencies...

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We have health challenges in this country that science will provide answers for if given the chance and we haven't given science that opportunity
Mary Woolley, President and CEO, Research!America