American Public Health Association

Despite the tremendous improvements in health we’ve made in the 20th century, Americans live shorter lives and suffer worse health outcomes than people in many other high-income countries. That’s why this week, during National Public Health Week , the American Public Health Association, Research America and hundreds of partners across the country are rallying around a goal of making the U.S. the Healthiest Nation in One Generation — by 2030. We're building a national movement of people, communities and organizations working to ensure conditions where everyone has the opportunity to be healthy. While maintaining a healthy lifestyle and having access to health insurance are critical...
As 2015 comes to an end, let’s revisit the top ten most popular Research!America blog posts of the year (based on page views) that emphasized the importance of communicating the value of research and making research and innovation a higher national priority. We would like to thank our outstanding guest bloggers, including early career scientists, and leaders representing academia, industry, patient groups and scientific societies, who believe in the endless possibilities of scientific discovery, development and delivery to improve our nation’s health. 1) Lessons learned from a workshop on effective science communication April 24 : Our most popular post of the year! Debra Cooper, Ph.D., a...
Dear Research Advocate, The current continuing resolution (CR) expires tomorrow. Congress has yet to reach agreement on FY16 appropriations, so they will buy more time to hammer out a funding package by passing another CR lasting til midnight Wednesday, December 16. The major sticking points at this moment are additional policy riders attached to the funding omnibus, spanning the spectrum from immigration and refugees to labor and environmental issues. As it looks right now, some research-related budgets stand to gain, while others face a less positive fate. There’s more on NIH in my interview with The Atlantic , and we continue to press for increases for CDC, FDA, AHRQ and NSF. Social,...
Dear Research Advocate: The short answer to what defense and public health have in common is that they are critical long-term investments for the nation. We have been hearing a lot of talk about funding increased investment in defense by taking it "off budget," and now former House Majority Leader, Eric Cantor, is calling for the same approach for investment in research. Cantor made the case today in the Huffington Post for increasing non-defense discretionary spending, specifically by increasing scientific and medical research, citing the “stimulative” economic power of innovation and basic research. Former Majority Leader Cantor’s call may resonate particularly strongly in the current...
This week, communities across the country are celebrating National Public Health Week . This annual observance recognizes the invaluable work public health professionals contribute to keeping our communities healthy and safe. It also reminds us of the importance of prevention in ensuring the health of our nation. We face a growing burden of chronic disease that is clearly unsustainable. Largely preventable conditions like heart disease, diabetes and stroke are taking too great a toll in lives and investments lost. We must reduce rates of disease and disability if we hope to create a healthier nation. Conducting research that promotes health and prevents disease is an important step in the...
left to right: Mary Woolley, president and CEO, Research!America; Jack T. Watters, MD, Research!America Board member and VP for External Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc.; and U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, MD, at Research!America’€™s 2012 Advocacy Awards Dinner Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, MD, recently announced her resignation as the nation’€™s top doctor after four years in the post. Dr. Benjamin, the 18th surgeon general, has been an active advocate for public health with a special interest in disease prevention, smoking cessation and healthy lifestyles. ’€œShe has been a remarkable advocate in promoting the value of prevention as a national health priority. She forged the way as...
The public health community is on alert over a new strain of avian flu that has made the jump from birds to people, resulting in six confirmed deaths in China. ’€œAt this point it’€™s a matter of anxious waiting and good surveillance,’€ Research!America Board member Georges Benjamin, MD, executive director of the American Public Health Association, told Politico Pro. Scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are joining forces with other international researchers to track this new strain, H7N9. Thus far, the only infected individuals appear to have come into direct contact with sick birds, indicating that currently this new strain cannot be passed from person to person...
Join the American Public Health Association for a live Twitter chat at 2pm ET on Wednesday, April 3 as part of the activities for National Public Health Week. Engage with fellow public health advocates on important topics you care about. The hour-long chat will focus on the value of public health and its return on investment in our communities. Follow #NPHWchat on Twitter to participate in the discussion about ways in which evidence-based disease prevention and health promotion initiatives can save lives and money. You can also follow National Public Health Week and Research!America on Twitter.
April 1-7 is National Public Health Week. The theme for NPHW this year highlights the return on investment we all get from public health initiatives. Resources from the American Public Health Association outline a unique focus for each day this week to show how multifaceted public health issues are impacting our lives at home, at school, in the workplace, while we travel and in our communities. How does public health help you? With rapidly rising medical care costs, controlling this area of both our national and personal budgets is a key concern. Not to mention the improvement to our quality of life that results from healthier individuals and communities. Public health research has shown...
For every dollar spent on prevention, more than five dollars is saved in health spending. Every $1 spent on childhood vaccines saves $16.50 in future health care costs. To learn more about how public health research benefits our lives every day, please check out the American Public Health Association’€™s Public Health Infographic and make sure to thank your public health professionals on the Monday of Thanksgiving, Public Health Thank You Day . Source: APHA

Sidebar Quote

Without continued support for health research, many of the most promising young scientists, their ideas and a myriad of potentially life-changing scientific breakthroughs will vanish into oblivion.
Paul Marinec, PhD; University of California San Francisco