breast cancer

What, in y our view, are the major challenges facing our nation’s research enterprise? Biomedical research is the driving force behind decades of advances that have improved the health of people in every corner of America—including the lives of those affected by breast cancer. With a robust and sustained investment in biomedical research, the possibilities would be endless. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and its National Cancer Institute (NCI) have played a role in every major cancer prevention, detection and treatment advance in breast cancer for decades. Within the NIH, the NCI is the principal agency for cancer research and training. The NCI has funded numerous major breast...
This article appeared on October 1, 2015 in The Huffington Post. “What are those things about breast cancer that keep you up at night?” It’s a question I’m asked frequently in my role as president and CEO of the largest breast cancer organization. And to be honest, there are many things. Among them is a misconception I sometimes hear that because breast cancer still kills, we’ve made no progress over the past three decades. And, because we have so more to do in breast cancer, what science, medicine, technology and a large and dedicated breast cancer community have already accomplished means little. But ask any patient who has another year of life thanks to therapies like Tamoxifen,...
Excerpt of an op-ed by Susan G. Komen President and CEO Judith A. Salerno published in The Huffington Post . As I conducted numerous media interviews about the continued need for research, education, treatment support, and advocacy, it occurred to me that it would be great if we were talking about breast cancer like this every day of the year. It’s really quite simple. Breast cancer doesn’t know (and doesn’t care) that it’s October, because breast cancer is diagnosed and kills women and men every day of every month of every year. Every 19 seconds, somewhere in the world, a person has a new diagnosis of breast cancer. In the U.S., a woman is diagnosed every two minutes, and one dies every 13...
Dear Research Advocate: The loss of American Icon Robin Williams has riveted national attention on suicide, one of the 10 most common causes of death in the United States. Today, we are releasing our updated fact sheet on suicide that you can use when meeting with lawmakers and educating others about the impact research can have. Efforts to prevent suicide rightly draw on research findings. But progress has been painfully slow, stymied by serious gaps – partly due to severely limited funding – in the basic research base that precedes private sector development, and stymied by the equivalent of handcuffs placed on social science research. The notion promulgated by some in the Congress that...
Research!America’€™s newest fact sheet series highlights the personal stories of medical research and the importance of increasing the NIH budget in FY15. We hope you will share these fact sheets with your representatives or congressional candidates, or take it with you on Hill or in-district visits. No one who reads these stories can doubt the significance of medical progress. A stronger investment in research is needed now more than ever! Here are their stories: John Hudson Dilgen, Epidermolysis Bullosa Steve DeWitte, Parkinson’s disease Victor Medina, Traumatic Brain Injury Carrie Scott, Multiple Sclerosis Max Hasenauer, X-linked agammaglobulinemia Michael Moskowitz, non-Hodgkin’s...
Dear Research Advocate: My colleagues at Research!America have shared the role as author of our weekly letter during my recent sabbatical. My thanks to them for providing timely and actionable information to our wide network. As I am ’€œre-entering’€ the Washington space, I have been struck by (1) the significantly worse condition of the roads ’€” potholes everywhere, and now even sinkholes in DC! I’€™ve been in several global capitals this spring, including in less-developed countries, and DC doesn’€™t look good in comparison. Via recent domestic travels, I can attest to the poor condition of our roads nationwide, taking a toll on vehicles and our economy, while eroding public confidence...
It’€™s Breast Cancer Awareness Month! Although many great strides in new treatments and therapies for breast cancer have been made, patients and their families are still waiting desperately for a cure. According to the American Cancer Society , breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers. About 1 in 8 women in the U.S. will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. This month, organizations will raise awareness and funding for breast cancer, and it’€™s important that we continue advocating to policy makers, media and the public about the importance of funding research at the level of scientific opportunity. Throughout October, please...
It’€™s Breast Cancer Awareness Month! Although many great strides in new treatments and therapies for breast cancer have been made, patients and their families are still waiting desperately for a cure. According to the American Cancer Society , breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women, except for skin cancers. About 1 in 8 women in the U.S. will develop invasive breast cancer during their lifetime. This month, organizations will raise awareness and funding for breast cancer, and it’€™s important that we continue advocating to policy makers, media and the public about the importance of funding research at the level of scientific opportunity. Throughout October, please...
By John Seffrin and Michael Caligiuri An excerpt of an op-ed by John R. Seffrin, PhD, CEO of the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network and Research!America Board member, and Michael A. Caligiuri, MD, director of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center and CEO of the James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute published in U.S News & World Report . Michael A. Caligiuri, MD John R. Seffrin, PhD Clinical trials are often a patient’€™s only viable treatment option for surviving cancer ’€“ a disease that kills 1,500 people every day in this country. But haphazard federal budget cuts, a consequence of the so-called “sequester” that was initiated in March,...
The much-contested question of whether or not a gene can be patented is under judicial scrutiny once again. The U.S. Supreme Court listened to oral arguments today regarding Myriad Genetic’€™s patent of two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which have been linked to increased cancer risk in both women and men. The American Civil Liberties Union is challenging this patent on behalf of a group of researchers, medical groups and patients. The timing of the hearing is rather serendipitous, just one day after the 10 th anniversary of the completion of the Human Genome Project. The Human Genome Project, a jointly funded venture from the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, has opened...

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Sidebar Quote

If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana