Campaign for Cures

The July/August 2016 of The Research Advocate is now online . Highlights from this month include: Announcing a new interactive map and blog as part of the national voter education initiative Campaign for Cures . The user-friendly map of the U.S. features hundreds of quotes on medical progress from candidates across the political spectrum. The Campaign for Cures blog is packed with information related to the election, patient stories, events, and commentary on science, research, and innovation. Registration is now open for the 2016 National Health Research Forum . The event, titled Straight Talk: New Thinking on Tough Challenges , will feature thought-provoking panel discussions on complex...
Research!America today unveiled the Campaign for Cures 2016 election blog and an online interactive map . The interactive map features hundreds of quotes from candidates across the political spectrum related to public and private sector research and innovation. The blog, managed by former USA Today senior editor and health reporter Janice Lloyd, features election news, survey data, commentary and analysis of presidential and congressional races in key states on topics relevant to medical progress. The map and blog are the latest resources for voters as part of Campaign for Cures: Vote for Medical Progress , a national voter education initiative supported by Research!America and partner...
Dear Research Advocate: If you’ve read Ron Chernow’s “Hamilton,” you know that the partisan stand-off we are witnessing in the House, and more broadly across the nation, is not new. Chernow reminds us that political parties -- not originally foreseen by the Founding Fathers -- grew out of intense and often ugly disagreements between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson during the second administration of George Washington. That insight doesn’t make this week’s turn of events less dramatic, but it does offer perspective. In the midst of the Democratic sit-in on preventing gun violence, the House adjourned earlier than expected and won’t resume business until July 5. Just before adjourning...
Dear Research Advocate: Every seat was taken in the main Carnegie Institution auditorium, and in a large overflow room as well, for a presentation on CRISPR genome editing delivered by Dr. Jennifer Doudna of UC Berkeley. The Monday evening program, which has open to the public, was co-sponsored by the Carnegie Institution for Science, the Council of Scientific Society Presidents and the Kavli Foundation. In addition to explaining how CRISPR-Cas9 is revolutionizing the ‘software’ of biology, Doudna reflected on ethical issues including the conduct of human germline research. In doing so she echoed one of the obstacles to advancing science listed in a slide deck presented by White House...
With the Presidential race narrowing and congressional races heating up, issues surrounding the health of Americans will likely come to the forefront. Scientists committed to reducing the burden of disease and finding cures are speaking up and urging all candidates to share their plans to advance medical progress. Public policies in support of medical innovation are increasingly important to address health threats that claim millions of lives and disrupt our economy. If elected, will candidates ensure increased funding for medical research is among their top priorities? Will they remove barriers to private sector innovation? As part of our national voter education initiative, Campaign for...
Dear Research Advocate: Last Sunday, the National Academy of Sciences presented its prestigious Public Welfare Medal to Alan Alda, actor and science communicator, who joins an esteemed group of Medal awardees, including Bill and Melinda Gates and Research!America’s Chair, former Congressman John Porter. In Alda’s acceptance remarks he described a scenario in which members of Congress passed notes to each other during testimony by scientists: “Do you get this? What are they talking about?” In short, a failure of what he called ‘relatability.’ He went on to say that scientists are, all too often, not just failing to communicate with non-scientists, but ‘ex-communicating’ them from science...
Dear Research Advocate: A report out this week by United Health Foundation concluded that an astonishing 72% of Americans have at least one of the five most impactful “unhealthy behaviors” (smoking, physical inactivity, insufficient sleep, excessive drinking or obesity). A White House report out this week quantifies the massive public health threat brought on by climate change and outlines the emerging issues, supporting evidence and the research required to curb these predicted effects. The need for improved public health is more evident then ever, and public health research is the best way to develop evidence-based, outcome-oriented interventions. Good thing it’s National Public Health...
Dear Research Advocate: I’m pleased to announce that Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) will be giving remarks at our Annual Meeting on March 16 at noon at the Willard Intercontinental Hotel. We will also be hearing from newly confirmed FDA commissioner Dr. Robert Califf and ALS patient advocate Lorri Carey. I hope you’ll join us at the annual meeting as well as at the Annual Advocacy Awards Dinner that evening. See our ad in Roll Call . Senators Patty Murray (D-WA) and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) were joined by the eight other democratic members of the Senate HELP Committee today as they introduced the National Biomedical Research Act . This bill would provide a new mandatory funding stream for NIH...
Today, February 29, 2016, is not only a special day because it's leap day, but also because it is Rare Disease Day . Taking place on the last day of February every year, Rare Disease Day is a chance for the rare disease community to come together and raise awareness to the public and to policymakers about rare diseases and their effects on people’s lives around the world. This campaign brings together over 80 countries worldwide in the effort to find cures and advocate for more research and development, and is sponsored by the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) , as well as the European Organization for Rare Disorders (EURODIS). This year's theme is “Patient Voice,” identifying...
Dear Research Advocate: This week I had the pleasure of participating in a research “summit” hosted by Louisiana State University (LSU), Research!America, and our honorary host, Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA). I moderated a powerhouse panel featuring NIH Director Francis Collins, M.D., NSF Director France Cordova, Ph.D., and FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) Director Janet Woodcock, M.D., each of whom offered state-specific illustrations of the impact federally-funded Louisiana research has had to date, and signalled the many opportunities Louisiana has to do more. This standing-room-only, high-content gathering drew research, academic, business and philanthropic leaders...

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Sidebar Quote

We have health challenges in this country that science will provide answers for if given the chance and we haven't given science that opportunity
Mary Woolley, President and CEO, Research!America