Campaign for Cures

The October 2015 issue of The Research Advocate is now online . Highlights from this month's issue include: Recap of events in Washington, DC, such as Research!America's National Health Research Forum and the Rally for Medical Research. A federal policy update with details on the budget and appropriations agenda in Congress. A member spotlight featuring the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Information on Research!America's new voter education initiative, Campaign for Cures. Download the entire October 2015 Research Advocate as a PDF .
Dear Research Advocate: Pope Francis’ visit to Washington has been a breath of fresh air, but now Congress must get to work and reach a funding agreement that avoids a government shutdown beginning October 1st. Didn’t we learn from the last shutdown, just two years ago? Young patients were turned away from clinical trials at NIH. Disease outbreaks were not monitored because CDC epidemiologists were furloughed. Drugs, devices and other medical products pending FDA approval were delayed. All of this -- and much, much more -- was then and is now, entirely avoidable. Advocates should not be complacent; a government shutdown screams “broken government,” and should not even be on the table...
Dear Research Advocate, It was a privilege to address the terrific crowd at last night’s kick off reception for the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Rally for Medical Research. Forceful champions including Senators Durbin (D-IL), Moran (R-KS), Murray (D-WA) and Klobuchar (D-MN) joined NIH Director Francis Collins to thank and encourage the more than 300 advocates who are blanketing both Houses of Congress today. Adding in social media attention, the Rally is likely to reach every member of Congress. During remarks at a Rally breakfast this morning, House “Labor-H” Appropriations Subcommittee Chairman Tom Cole (R-OK-04) revved up the crowd when he said that “the stars are...
The race for votes has begun yet candidates have been tight-lipped on what should be done to advance U.S. medical innovation. If elected, what will they do to help find cures for costly and deadly diseases like Alzheimer’s and cancer? Will they assign a higher priority to medical research and ensure policies keep pace with scientific opportunity or will they take medical progress for granted? Voters want to know. With the election season underway, Research!America has launched a new national voter education initiative, Campaign for Cures: Vote for Medical Progress! The initiative aims to engage candidates running for national office and voters on issues relevant to the health and well-being...

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Without continued support for health research, many of the most promising young scientists, their ideas and a myriad of potentially life-changing scientific breakthroughs will vanish into oblivion.
Paul Marinec, PhD; University of California San Francisco