cancer

More than 1.6 million people developed cancer in the U.S. in 2015, and 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women will be diagnosed with cancer over the course of their lives. Cancer also has a major fiscal impact: the economic burden totaled $263.8 billion in 2013, translating to nearly $900 per American. On March 10, 2016, Research!America, in partnership with AcademyHealth, American Cancer Society, and Celgene Corporation convened a panel of cancer experts to discuss how research is working to stop cancer. Dr. Lisa Simpson, president and CEO of AcademyHealth, started the conversation by outlining cancer innovation as a continuum. Basic research provides answers on how living organisms work and what...
Dear Research Advocate: As task force meetings for Vice President Biden’s “moonshot” initiative began this week, a new public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America showed that 50% of Americans favor a tax increase to fund cancer research. While this manner of funding the moonshot is not currently on the table, the survey finding underscores the high priority Americans place on curing cancer. The President told Majority Leader McConnell and Speaker Ryan that assuring resources for research, cancer in particular, is one of his five priorities for working across the aisle this year. His FY17 budget proposal -- scheduled for release next Tuesday -- will reportedly request additional...
Candidates running for national office never miss an opportunity to share their solutions on the many problems facing our country with voters. From terrorism to transportation to education, the presidential candidates clamor for attention on hot button issues of the day. Yet they are not outlining their proposed solutions for healing what literally ails Americans - Alzheimer's disease, cancer, mental illnesses, and many other health threats. Despite the prevalence of disease and its impact to our health, economy and national security, candidates seem to be giving this issue a pass. Only 14% of Americans say they are very well-informed of the positions of current candidates for President...
Over the next three weeks, Congress has an opportunity to reverse decades of declining support for a program that is vital to our nation’s public health. House and Senate appropriators will soon determine how to allocate $25 billion in additional non-defense discretionary spending for fiscal year (FY) 2016 before the continuing resolution expires on December 11. They now have the opportunity to address the damage resulting from years’ long stagnation in federally-funded research and reinvest in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Supporters of Research!America are fully aware of the decline in our federal research enterprise. The lack of...
As many as one-half of all cancers are preventable based on what we already understand. Despite many promising and innovative new therapies, cancer prevention remains “Plan A,” our first and best hope to reduce the burden of this disease. I recently shared key points of this plan, described below, in a June 1, 2015 lecture at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. At The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center , we established the cancer prevention and control platform within the Moon Shots program. Our mission is to develop and implement evidence-based actions in cancer prevention, screening, early detection and survivorship in clinical and community settings to...
November 20, 2014 Congressman Tom Cole’s leadership on the Labor-HHS-Education subcommittee will help shape our ability to sustain and accelerate medical innovation as we confront health crises here and abroad. As a steward of the federal funding that lays the noncommercial foundation for private sector medical progress, Congressman Cole will play a pivotal role in determining whether our nation conquers Alzheimer’s, childhood cancer, Ebola and other insidious health threats. We commend his efforts to ensure quality health care for veterans, remove barriers to innovation through the repeal of the medical device tax and advance other health and research-related initiatives. We look forward...
Excerpt of a joint op-ed by Research!America President and CEO Mary Woolley and Susan G. Komen President and CEO Judith A. Salerno published in The Huffington Post . February 23, 1954, was a milestone in the history of American medical research. That day, children at Arsenal Elementary School in Pittsburgh lined up to receive injections of a promising vaccine. Within months, schoolchildren all over the country were doing the same, and polio was on its way to being eradicated in the United States. The disease, which had killed and paralyzed children and adults alike, would no longer be a threat. This remarkable achievement would not have been possible without the work of Dr. Jonas Salk and...
Research!America applauds Senator Tom Harkin for taking bold, decisive action to heal fissures in our nation’€™s research pipeline with legislation that will strengthen the National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget over the next six years. The Accelerate Biomedical Research Act will establish a pathway for sustained growth in the NIH budget. That budget has remained virtually stagnant over the last decade, jeopardizing promising research to combat disease and deflating the aspirations of early career scientists. NIH-funded research fuels the development of lifesaving therapies and treatments, and creates opportunities for public-private partnerships to better understand Alzheimer’€™s,...
Research!America’€™s newest fact sheet series highlights the personal stories of medical research and the importance of increasing the NIH budget in FY15. We hope you will share these fact sheets with your representatives or congressional candidates, or take it with you on Hill or in-district visits. No one who reads these stories can doubt the significance of medical progress. A stronger investment in research is needed now more than ever! Here are their stories: John Hudson Dilgen, Epidermolysis Bullosa Steve DeWitte, Parkinson’s disease Victor Medina, Traumatic Brain Injury Carrie Scott, Multiple Sclerosis Max Hasenauer, X-linked agammaglobulinemia Michael Moskowitz, non-Hodgkin’s...
Leading up to Father’€™s Day and as part of National Men’€™s Health Week, the American Cancer Society is raising awareness about risk factors for cancer in men. Among the cancer threats men face, prostate cancer is particularly lethal. In fact, it is the 2nd most deadly cancer for American men behind lung cancer. This year alone in the United States, an estimated 233,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 29,480 men will die from the disease. Prostate cancer is also one of the most costly forms of cancer, with $11.9 billion spent on treatment each year in the US. Despite these grim statistics, significant progress has been made in the area of prostate cancer research...

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Funding research gives all of us a better chance of living a healthier life.
Pam Hirata, heart disease survivor