#CuresNOW

Dear Research Advocate: With congressional primaries back in full swing -- four states held primaries this week alone, with five more to come this month -- we have fresh opportunities to ask candidates for national office what they would do, if elected, to speed medical progress and incentivize innovation. Check out our interactive map to see what your candidates have to say -- we have been adding quotes daily. This is important: if you don’t see your candidates on the record, please send them a message urging them to register their thoughts. Research!America has joined ScienceDebate.org and other organizations to call on presidential candidates to respond to a questionnaire about...
A century of basic scientific research on retroviruses was required for the current advances in cancer and HIV prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and gene therapy to be achieved. Furthermore, our understanding of normal cell growth, human development, genetics, and evolution would be immensely impoverished if it were not for scientists pursuing their curiosity about peculiar animal viruses for over 100 years. Finally, numerous valuable technologies and commercial products have emerged from studies investigating how retroviruses are transmitted. The viruses that are now known as the avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses were discovered in 1908 and 1911. It was remarkable that birds could get...
For athletes and spectators who are attending the Olympic Games this month, the threat of deadly antibiotic resistant bacteria is all too real. Recently the “bad bug” carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumonia (KPC) was discovered in the waters off several beaches of Rio, where rowing, canoeing and swimming events are scheduled to occur. KPC is one example of antibiotic resistant bacteria, which already sicken at least two million Americans every year. If people visiting Rio for the Olympics become infected with KPC, they may bring it back home, quickly spreading this dangerous bacterium around the world. Without support for new antibiotic R&D, such as the 21 st Century Cures Act,...
In the development phase, scientists conduct translational research using clinical trials and other research paradigms to refine and apply the knowledge gained through basic research to develop lifesaving treatments. We hope the final Cures package modernizes clinical trials and increases participant diversity, encourages the development of new antibiotics, incentivizes research into treatments for rare diseases and diseases afflicting children, breaks down data silos, invests in regulatory science and incorporates patient perspectives into the research and regulatory process. Take action! Join our Twitter chat on Wednesday, August 10 at 1:00 pm EST with the Association of Clinical Research...
This blog post originally appeared August 3, 2016 on the Sick Chicks and The Mighty . "Congress is working together on a nonpartisan issue that will have a profound effect on the lives of all Americans. H.R. 6, the 21st Century Cures Act, will bring our health care innovation infrastructure into the 21st Century, delivering hope for patients and loved ones and providing necessary resources to researchers to continue their efforts to uncover the next generation of cures and treatments." - Mission Statement , House Committee of Energy Commerce, 21st Century Cures Is it just me or do you get chills reading that paragraph? Finding advocacy allowed me take control of an uncontrollable situation...
Dear Research Advocate: Both the Republican and Democratic platforms highlight the importance of achieving medical progress, responding to the fact that Americans place a high value on achieving health and wellness (see my Huffington Post blog last Friday discussing our newest survey results ). A portion of the first day of the Democratic convention this week was devoted to public health topics, including the opioid abuse crisis . Secretary Clinton chose Senator Tim Kaine as her running mate, a policymaker with a solid track record on public health; a strong proponent of prevention. In Sen. Kaine’s speech last evening, he emphasized the importance of research to defeat Alzheimer’s and...
Dear Research Advocate: This has been an important week for research, innovation and the power of advocacy. The Senate Appropriations Committee passed the Labor-H bill, which funds NIH, CDC and AHRQ, among other programs. The bill includes a well-justified, but nonetheless remarkable, $2 billion increase for NIH in FY17. However, CDC and AHRQ both receive cuts in the bill ($118 million and $10 million, respectively). While we applaud Chairman Blunt (R-MO), Ranking Member Murray (D-WA) and the Committee as a whole for their extraordinary determination to regrow the NIH budget, underinvesting in CDC and AHRQ is a costly mistake. Read our statement on the bill. It is important to note that...

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Without research, there is no hope.
The Honorable Paul G. Rogers