diabetes

“Though we’ve been gloried in success, we still have unfinished business” when it comes to tackling cardiovascular disease, said NHLBI Director Dr. Gary Gibbons, highlighting the findings of a new American Heart Association-commissioned analysis at an event in Washington, D.C. last week. The report presented data on what lies ahead in cardiovascular disease prevalence and costs over the next few decades. Projections found more than 131 million people – or about 45 percent of the U.S. population – could suffer from cardiovascular disease by 2035, and annual costs related to this – both direct medical costs and lost productivity – could surpass $1 trillion; that’s more than all other chronic...
For over 30 years, researchers have been studying the role oral health plays on overall health. Much of this research has focused on determining the relationship between periodontal disease and systemic diseases such as diabetes. And while research on this continues through today, enough is known to safely say that the presence of periodontal disease is associated with diabetes. Through existing studies, researchers have come to believe that the inflammation from the infected gum tissue enters the blood stream and affects a variety of organ systems. In a patient with diabetes, this results in a higher HbA1c level and impaired ability to control serum glucose. Findings also suggest that a...
Dear Research Advocate, "Never Settle" is the empowering guiding theme used by Janssen Pharmaceuticals to underscore the emphasis the company places on innovation to benefit patients. In my visit to their Spring House, PA, site today to participate in a worldwide town hall, I was struck by how their theme epitomizes the advocacy drive and determination of Research!America and all our partners in advocacy for research. I was glad to report to Janssen's teams that more and more members of Congress are championing research and innovation to benefit patients worldwide. Consider the comments of Chairman Roy Blunt (R-MO) about the FY16 Senate “Labor-H” appropriations draft, which reportedly...
This week, communities across the country are celebrating National Public Health Week . This annual observance recognizes the invaluable work public health professionals contribute to keeping our communities healthy and safe. It also reminds us of the importance of prevention in ensuring the health of our nation. We face a growing burden of chronic disease that is clearly unsustainable. Largely preventable conditions like heart disease, diabetes and stroke are taking too great a toll in lives and investments lost. We must reduce rates of disease and disability if we hope to create a healthier nation. Conducting research that promotes health and prevents disease is an important step in the...
Did you know that nearly 26 million children and adults in the U.S. have diabetes, and another 79 million Americans have pre-diabetes and are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), a Research!America member? During the month of November, the ADA, along with other organizations, will raise awareness and understanding about this increasingly prevalent disease and ways to prevent it. This year’€™s theme is ’€œA Day in the Life of Diabetes,’€ because diabetes doesn’€™t stop; it’€™s 24/7, 365 days a year. Visit ADA’€™s website , Twitter , and Facebook page to learn more about ways you can participate. Researchers are making progress in...
By Endocrine Society President Teresa K. Woodruff, PhD The sad stories flow in each day. A post-doctoral fellow gives up scientific research after 10 years of training. A cancer researcher faces a fruitless job search and expiring visa. The endocrinologist agonizes over letting a long-time lab employee go. Hundreds of these tales are unfolding across the country as the National Institutes of Health struggles to stretch its dwindling budget. Because of sequestration, an NIH budget that barely kept pace with inflation through the 1990s and early 2000s was slashed by another $1.6 billion this fiscal year. If Congress cannot agree on a more balanced approach to budget cuts, another $6.7 billion...
By Endocrine Society President Teresa K. Woodruff, PhD The sad stories flow in each day. A post-doctoral fellow gives up scientific research after 10 years of training. A cancer researcher faces a fruitless job search and expiring visa. The endocrinologist agonizes over letting a long-time lab employee go. Hundreds of these tales are unfolding across the country as the National Institutes of Health struggles to stretch its dwindling budget. Because of sequestration, an NIH budget that barely kept pace with inflation through the 1990s and early 2000s was slashed by another $1.6 billion this fiscal year. If Congress cannot agree on a more balanced approach to budget cuts, another $6.7 billion...
John Eng, MD, was recently named as the latest winner of the Golden Goose Awards. Eng is the second winner announced in 2013, and others will be named in the coming weeks. The Golden Goose Award was created last year to celebrate researchers whose seemingly odd or obscure federally funded research turned out to have a significant, positive impact on society. Eng, a one-time researcher with the Veterans Administration in New York City, discovered that the venom contained in the bite of a Gila monster ’€” a lizard native to the southwest U.S. and northwest Mexico ’€” had components that could aid diabetics. His research was funded by the VA and built on previous studies funded by the National...
John Eng, MD, was recently named as the latest winner of the Golden Goose Awards. Eng is the second winner announced in 2013, and others will be named in the coming weeks. The Golden Goose Award was created last year to celebrate researchers whose seemingly odd or obscure federally funded research turned out to have a significant, positive impact on society. Eng, a one-time researcher with the Veterans Administration in New York City, discovered that the venom contained in the bite of a Gila monster ’€” a lizard native to the southwest U.S. and northwest Mexico ’€” had components that could aid diabetics. His research was funded by the VA and built on previous studies funded by the National...
An excerpt of an op-ed by Robert I. Field, PhD, JD, MPH, professor of the Earle Mack School of Law & Drexel School of Public Health published in Philly.com . Robert I. Field, PhD, JD, MPH What do we get when Congress cuts federal spending across-the-board? Does it bring lower taxes, smaller deficits, and less bureaucracy? How about worse health care, less medical innovation, and lost lives? The budget sequester that Congress enacted in 2011 began to take effect this year with spending cuts for most federal programs. So far, the majority of Americans have seen little change. Some may even applaud the idea of forcing the federal government to make due with less. But the sequester is about...

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Paul Marinec, PhD; University of California San Francisco