FasterCures

Dear Research Advocate, In a week with lots of mixed signals on health care, we released new survey data that shows a striking increase in public support for empowering patients (and we are all patients!) to participate in clinical trials. A strong majority say joining a clinical trial is as valuable as donating blood. And a new question shows the public would value providers discussing clinical trials as a routine part of health care. These findings come just as NIH’s “All of Us” initiative launches a new grant program to encourage enrollment in the ambitious one million-enrollee clinical research effort. Read more about our survey , and plan to attend our National Health Research Forum in...
The more researchers know about how different therapies work and for whom they work, the faster they can make progress in finding treatments, said Dr. William Nelson, director of Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center during a panel discussion on March 8 about precision medicine moderated by The Washington Post’s Laurie McGinley. The discussion was part of Johns Hopkins Medicine’s On the Road to Precision Medicine Health Care Leader Series , which explores topics of cost, communication, research, and health care delivery in relation to precision medicine. Regarding concerns that the drug approval process is too lengthy, Nelson said that the efficiency achieved by focusing on creating targeted...
The December 2015 issue of the The Research Advocate is now online . Highlights from this month include: A new report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine highlighting advances in nursing and areas where more work is needed. An update on the FY16 congressional appropriations process. Public Health Thank You Day on November 23 honored public health heroes. A Member Spotlight featuring the National Medical Association. Collection of essays published by FasterCures from leaders in medical research, highlighting innovative ideas to advance innovation. Download the entire December 2015 Research Advocate as a PDF.
Could a 21 st Century Cures bill that modernizes the research ecosystem cross the finish line in Congress in the near future? We’re moving in the right direction, according to most of the panelists featured in POLITICO Pro’s “How Fast to Cures?” discussion on October 7, 2015 at the Newseum in Washington D.C. “For the first time in decades, with the House bill of 21 st Century Cures and with the Senate companion piece that they are working on, we’re seeing a revving up of our full ecosystem of discovery, development and delivery of medical progress that incorporates the patient community in ways that we’ve never seen,” said Mary Woolley, president and CEO, Research!America. Advocates should...
Research!America To Honor Leaders in Medical and Health Research Advocacy Robin Roberts, Michael Milken, Dr. Kenneth Olden, David Van Andel, Dr. George Vande Woude and the Society for Neuroscience to Receive 2015 Research!America Advocacy Awards ALEXANDRIA, Va.’€”September 29, 2014’€” Research!America’€™s 19th annual Advocacy Awards will honor distinguished research advocates who are trailblazers in advancing medical progress to improve the health and economic security of our nation. The event will take place on Wednesday, March 11, 2015, at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, DC. The 2015 Advocacy Award winners are ABC’€™s ’€œGood Morning America’€ anchor Robin Roberts; Michael...
Dear Research Advocate: The loss of American Icon Robin Williams has riveted national attention on suicide, one of the 10 most common causes of death in the United States. Today, we are releasing our updated fact sheet on suicide that you can use when meeting with lawmakers and educating others about the impact research can have. Efforts to prevent suicide rightly draw on research findings. But progress has been painfully slow, stymied by serious gaps – partly due to severely limited funding – in the basic research base that precedes private sector development, and stymied by the equivalent of handcuffs placed on social science research. The notion promulgated by some in the Congress that...
Dear Research Advocate: The omnibus appropriations bill about to become law demonstrates that bipartisanship and pseudo -regular order is achievable. We won’€™t know for sure if we have true ’€œregular order’€ until Congress proceeds through the FY15 appropriations process in a timely manner ’€” something that hasn’€™t happened for many years. The importance of regular order is that the public’€™s interests are heard from in hearings, and every Member of Congress participates in priority-setting instead of only having the opportunity to cast a single up-or-down vote. Regular order is worth working toward, since at least one priority we all care about did not fare well in the omnibus. The...
Dear Research Advocate: Setting our nation’€™s sights high, rather than watching Rome burn; that’€™s the advice embedded in a recent op-ed authored by John R. Seffrin, PhD (CEO of the American Cancer Society and Research!America Board Member) and Michael Caligiuri, MD (CEO of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Center Hospital and Solove Research Institute). The authors advocate establishing a national plan, one that puts political differences aside and focuses on combating deadly and tremendously costly disease. There is a compelling argument to be made that if our nation wants to sustain a balanced budget, it must deploy a disease moonshot. If our nation...
Photo credit: Smithsonian This month ’€œGenome: Unlocking Life’s Code,’€ first state-of-the-art exhibition about genome science, opened at the Museum of Natural History in partnership with the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) . The exhibit boasts cutting-edge interactives, 3D models, custom animations and engaging videos of real-life stories. According to Dr. Eric D. Green, director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), one of the 27 institutes and centers that make up the National Institutes of Health (NIH), “This exhibition reflects a remarkably productive collaboration between components of two scientific icons of the U.S. government – the Smithsonian...
We’€™ve heard plenty in the media about sequestration’€™s impact to federal agencies including furloughs and short-lived’€”delays at airports, but how is the biomedical research community dealing with the across-the-board cuts? The word ’€œfurlough’€ is something you would never hear in a research lab; time-sensitive research experiments cannot simply be put on hold. So how will the shortfall in budgets be met? Many researchers and universities are making tough decisions that could delay promising studies and result in layoffs. Below are resources with more details about sequestration’€™s impact to science and the economy. Research!America’€™s sequestration fact sheet . There are many more...

Sidebar Quote

Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed.
Abraham Lincoln