health

Why Research is Needed Now to Stop the Progression of Parkinson’s Disease Not long ago, as I approached middle age, I started feeling like I hit a wall. It didn’t make sense to me. At age 40 I set out on a path to be healthy at age 50, both physically and emotionally. I knew a lot of people who burned out at 50 and I wasn’t going to be one of them. I exercised regularly and ate a healthy diet heavy on fruits and vegetables. I had a strong support network both at home and work. Looking from the outside everything was great – our family was all healthy, our business had recovered from the great recession and everything seemed to be going my way both personally and professionally. Still,...
Consensus across numerous scientific studies shows that increased emissions of carbon dioxide contribute to the formation of ground level ozone and to increases in allergenic pollen production – both of which trigger asthma attacks and worsen allergic symptoms among the millions adults and children nationwide who are affected by asthma and/or seasonal allergic rhinitis. This mounting evidence demonstrates that the same changes that are contributing to changing the climate are affecting the health of people in the United States, especially those who have allergies or asthma. In collaboration with a research center at George Mason University, the national association of allergy doctors called...
Chronic diseases are a formidable public health challenge for the U.S. with more than 50 percent of Americans living daily with one or more chronic health conditions. The impact of these illnesses can be debilitating for individuals, families and local communities. Approximately 75 cents of every dollar spent on health care in 2009 was related to chronic illnesses which totaled $1.7 trillion . The main weapon available to treat chronic diseases, such as diabetes or high blood pressure, is medications. The average number of medications prescribed per capita increased from 10.1 in 1999 to 12.7 in 2014 . In fact, one of the most effective means to improve health outcomes is to ensure...
Astronaut Scott Kelly described the type of work underway on the International Space Station in a special satellite uplink at today's BIO International Convention luncheon. During a live interview, floating in zero-gravity, Kelly said they're working on 400 scientific projects on the station, and they hope to learn more about such things as bone loss and muscle wasting disease in space. With the latest technology, he said they're able to get plenty of data on human health performance and physiology, adding he hopes to learn "if there is a cliff out there in regards to our physiology as we go from six months to a year and longer." There are health related problems that can only be solved in...
Dear Research Advocate: What’s the “right” amount of taxpayer funding for medical and health research? What are the ‘right’ policies for science? We are asked these question regularly. The announcement yesterday by Harold Varmus that he will leave the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the end of this month reminded me that in Science in 1993, Dr. Varmus and fellow Nobel Laureate Michael Bishop, along with their then-colleague at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Mark Kirchner, set forth an 11-point prescription for science policy. It is worth re-reading their approach to a set of problems that bear a striking similarity to those we face today, e.g: “The last decade has...
We are reminded yet again why global health issues matter for Americans with recent news coverage of a possible tuberculosis outbreak at a Virginia high school that may have affected over 430 faculty and students. Health officials are recommending that all individuals at the school be tested for the disease. Tuberculosis bacteria Photo credit: CDC/ Dr. Ray Butler Historically, tuberculosis has been the world’€™s greatest infectious killer, taking an estimated billion lives over the past 200 years. Tuberculosis remains a global threat today ’€“ in 2011 alone, the disease sickened 8.7 million people. Even more alarming is the rise of drug-resistant forms of the disease. WHO estimates that...
Dr. Wallace H. Coulter Coulter. Medical diagnostics. See a link? Coulter is one-half of Beckman Coulter, a Research!America member and a company that boasts nearly $6 billion in market capitalization . And that half of a multi-billion-dollar, multinational company began with research on paint for the U.S. Navy. Such unlikely beginnings are the reason that Wallace Coulter has been named the first recipient of the Golden Goose Award for 2013 . More winners will be named during the coming months. The press release announcing the award explains Coulter’€™s research: In his time away from working for various electronics companies in the 1940s, Coulter built a lab in his garage and earned a grant...
October 3, 2012 The first Presidential debate was a missed opportunity for the candidates to outline a vision for putting research and innovation to work to improve health and strengthen the economy. Fleeting references to science and research failed to give voters confidence in this regard. We learned some things in this debate, but we are still — many of us literally — dying to know what either candidate will do to assure that research for health will be a priority for this nation. Without medical progress, driven by research and innovation, there will be no chance of controlling health care costs or assuring our nation’s continued leadership in the life sciences. We strongly urge the...

Sidebar Quote

We have health challenges in this country that science will provide answers for if given the chance and we haven't given science that opportunity
Mary Woolley, President and CEO, Research!America