innovation

Dear Research Advocate, Research!America is on the Hill and in the media continuing to make the case for timely action in Congress to boost medical progress. I appreciated the opportunity to discuss the 21st Century Cures Act and the Senate’s Innovation initiative in a recent issue of Roll Call . The bottom line is this: we need to keep this ball rolling. Congress has a notoriously short attention span - too many issues, not enough time - so advocates should not only be pushing for what they want to see in the Senate bill, they should be pushing to see a Senate bill ASAP. Unless you’ve managed to steer clear of all forms of media in recent days, you probably know that the first official...
This op-ed appeared online on Roll Call July 31, 2015. New technology such as CRISPR-Cas9, a genuine scientific breakthrough, is raising hope for patients with cancer, cystic fibrosis, sickle-cell anemia and other major health threats. The gene editing tool, used in precision medicine, allows changes to be introduced into the DNA of any living cell— potentially enabling repair of disease causing mutations, neutralization of disease carrying insects, and much more. This technology, developed with support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Science Foundation (NSF), is an example of the realization of the promise of innovative research funded by our federal science...
"There's not one fix" to ensuring patient access to innovative medicine. That appeared to be the consensus of moderator Christi Shaw, president, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation and panelists, discussing the opportunities and challenges in getting new therapies to patients with complex and chronic conditions like cancer, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis during a super session today at the BIO International Convention. Is the cost of some drugs a barrier? Are we adequately pricing the value of innovation? To ensure breakthroughs continue to reach patients, Scott Gottlieb, resident fellow, American Enterprise Institute, suggested that we need an approach to financing care that'...
Today is a social media Day of Action for Research!America and our #FindFundCure campaign. Join us all day on Twitter and Facebook by using the hashtag #findfundcure and make your voice heard. While Congress debates its budget for the upcoming fiscal year, we will advocate for accelerated progress in biomedical innovation by pressing for more research funding. Join us and share personal stories, relevant data, and compelling visuals to make the case that insufficient funding costs lives. It’s time to find the money, fund the research, and cure the disease! Spread the word and share our Day of Action toolkit , complete with sample messages and resource links, with your professional and...
Calls for greater federal investments in science and innovation are gaining momentum among Members of Congress and influencers. The nation’s leaders from across the political spectrum continue to push for more federal investments in research at this critical time as the government spends less on science as a percentage of GDP than it did 40 years ago. Research!America has collected recent quotes from opinion leaders and decision-makers. The quotes speak to their support for increasing science and research funding, and emphasize the importance of speaking out on this issue. To view the quotes, click here .
Dear Research Advocate: Research!America yesterday released our recommendations for the top five science priorities the new Congress should address in its first 100 days: end sequestration, increase funding for our nation’€™s research agencies, advance the 21st Century Cures Initiative legislation, repeal the medical device tax, and enact a permanent and enhanced R&D tax credit. See the full press release here . Among these priorities, ending sequestration is the steepest uphill climb – but what a difference it would make for the future of health and the nation’s economy! That’€™s the focus of this editable message to members of Congress. Please weigh in! Securing meaningful increases...
Letter to the editor by Research!America VP of Communications Suzanne Ffolkes published in The Gainesville Sun . In reference to the Dec. 28 editorial ’€œ Funding innovation ,’€ countless medical breakthroughs would not have been possible without the support of federal funding. It is imperative that research and innovation become a higher national priority for the new Congress. Bipartisan proposals to advance medical progress ’€” like the 21st Century Cures Initiative that includes provisions to boost federal funding for research, modernize clinical trials and incentivize the development of new drugs and devices, among others ’€” should be given serious consideration. Stagnant funding over...
This year’€™s Nobel prize winners in chemistry and medicine or physiology are testimony to the importance of basic research that, while it may not demonstrate immediate benefits to human health, can lead to a greater understanding of deadly disease. Research!America applauds Eric Betzig of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Stefan W. Hell of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Germany; and William E. Moerner of Stanford University, who received a graduate fellowship from the National Science Foundation, for their work in improving the resolution of optical microscopes. Their achievements have allowed scientists to study tiny cells, and in doing so, more clearly identify...
Image credit: National Institutes of Health Technological advances have paved the way for researchers to access a wealth of data about the biological cause of disease. Yet translating these discoveries into treatments remains a challenge. Promising drugs often fail in late phase clinical trials, costing time and money, and leaving patients’€™ lives hanging in the balance. One reason is that the right biological targets were not chosen from the start. To improve the current model for developing new diagnostics and treatments, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and several biopharmaceutical companies and non-profit organizations formed the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP), www...
Dear Research Advocate: Today, Chairwoman Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) released the Senate’€™s 302(b) allocations , which were approved by the Appropriations Committee. As you know from last week, the House 302(b) allocation for the Labor-HHS subcommittee is approximately $1 billion less in fiscal year 2015 than it was in FY 14.The Senate’€™s allocation for FY 15 is roughly the same as it was in FY 14. The bottom line is that, as expected, we have our work cut out for us to achieve the increases needed for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and our nation’€™s other health research agencies. Fortunately, Senator Mikulski and other leaders from both sides of the aisle understand the...

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