Janssen

March has been National Autoimmune Disease Awareness month, a month dedicated to increasing awareness and bringing greater focus to the myriad of immune diseases that affect more than 50 million Americans. At Janssen, we are focused on deepening our understanding of such complex diseases and advancing science to discover and develop innovative therapies for people living with immunologic diseases, while we also work toward a future where we hope to eliminate many of these devastating diseases altogether. I was honored to be part of a panel discussion on March 15th at the Research!America 28th Annual Meeting of Members in Washington, D.C. on the topic of lupus, an immune-mediated disease...
“As you’re advocating for research dollars, make sure you make it personal. Insightful stories, emotional stories, those things work,” said Rep. David McKinley (R-WV-01) during Research!America’s 28th Annual Meeting of Members held at the Willard Intercontinental Hotel in Washington, D.C., on March 15. McKinley, who lost his mother to Alzheimer’s, praised research programs like the National Institutes of Health (NIH) BRAIN initiative. “We know that the NIH supports over 400 thousand jobs across America. Every year NIH writes grants for $32 billion. That’s significant,” McKinley said. “So we’ve actually seen a very positive impact from what the NIH has done. [But] it’s not just creating jobs...
As 2015 comes to an end, let’s revisit the top ten most popular Research!America blog posts of the year (based on page views) that emphasized the importance of communicating the value of research and making research and innovation a higher national priority. We would like to thank our outstanding guest bloggers, including early career scientists, and leaders representing academia, industry, patient groups and scientific societies, who believe in the endless possibilities of scientific discovery, development and delivery to improve our nation’s health. 1) Lessons learned from a workshop on effective science communication April 24 : Our most popular post of the year! Debra Cooper, Ph.D., a...
A lab-turned-hospital for mice in Boston is helping researchers understand cancer in humans. Jessica Rinaldi for The New York Times Maybe this sounds like the opening line to one of those wasteful-spending reports, but it’€™s not. And the results ’€” while still a long way from producing a treatment ’€” have allowed researchers to gain insight into the links between cancer and a handful of mutated genes. New York Times reporter Gina Kolkata describes the ’€œhospital’€ at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: imaging devices writ small with a dedicated pharmacy and clinical lab. She follows researchers that are looking into prostate cancer. Mice are injected with a few rogue genes, and...

Sidebar Quote

The capabilities are enormous, a little bit of research can pay off quite a bit in the long run.
Paul D’ Addario, retinitis pigmentosa patient