John Porter

Dear Research Advocate: The doubling of the National Institutes of Health budget between FY99 and FY03 is an example of Congress at its most productive ’€¦ and it hinged on bipartisanship. A small group of Republicans and Democrats recognized the power of medical progress, and they worked together to increase the budget baseline for NIH by nearly $11.5 billion. Without that doubling, and with the stagnation of virtually all non-defense discretionary funding that followed on its heels, which groundbreaking medical discoveries would still lie dormant? Which of those we hold dear would not be alive today? Research!America Chair and former Congressman John Porter, who chaired the House Labor-...
Reps. Wolf and Fattah to Receive the Edwin C. Whitehead Award for Medical Research Advocacy at Research!America’€™s Advocacy Awards Dinner on March 12 ALEXANDRIA, Va. - February 12, 2014 -Reps. Frank Wolf (R-VA) and Chaka Fattah (D-PA) will receive the Edwin C. Whitehead Award for Medical Research Advocacy for their leadership and unwavering commitment to supporting policies that promote federal and private sector medical research and innovation. Reps. Wolf and Fattah have spearheaded efforts to create a legislative and regulatory climate conducive to medical innovation. “Representatives Wolf and Fattah are exceptional champions for research,” said Research!America Chair John Edward Porter...
Dear Research Advocate: NIH Director Francis Collins was recently interviewed for a Wall Street Journal article that would reinvigorate even the weariest research advocate. Dr. Collins captured the legacy and unprecedented potential of research for health, as well as the counterintuitive neglect of it, in a truly compelling manner. Dr. Collins made similarly captivating comments yesterday at the Washington Ideas Forum: “We’€™re going from the envy of the world,” he said, “to the puzzle of the world. Other nations are mystified that we have stopped following our own playbook ’€” the one they are using now to drive their economy and improve health and quality of life for their own populations...
Research!America’€™s National Health Research Forum ’€” held September 12 at the Newseum’€™s Knight Conference Center in Washington, DC ’€” examined the current and future state of research to improve health. This year’€™s theme was ’€œStraight Talk about the Future of Medical and Health Research.’€ Three expert panels delved into different aspects of the research ecosystem. Research!America’€™s president and CEO, Mary Woolley, and chair, The Honorable John Edward Porter, opened the program. Porter introduced Bart Peterson, JD, senior vice president of corporate affairs and communications at Lilly who delivered a brief keynote speech. ’€œWe developed an innovation ecosystem, and that...
Research!America’€™s National Health Research Forum ’€” held September 12 at the Newseum’€™s Knight Conference Center in Washington, DC ’€” examined the current and future state of research to improve health. This year’€™s theme was ’€œStraight Talk about the Future of Medical and Health Research.’€ Three expert panels delved into different aspects of the research ecosystem. Research!America’€™s president and CEO, Mary Woolley, and chair, The Honorable John Edward Porter, opened the program. Porter introduced Bart Peterson, JD, senior vice president of corporate affairs and communications at Lilly who delivered a brief keynote speech. ’€œWe developed an innovation ecosystem, and that...
Dear Research Advocate: Last week, I wrote about the international trade deficit our country faces. This week, I’€™d like to focus on the budget deficit. From 2003 to 2011, Medicare and Medicaid spending grew 74% while our economy only grew 35%. With that kind of differential, no government can balance its budget. We need research to address disabling and costly illnesses, but that won’t be enough in and of itself to bridge the gap. We also need tax and entitlement reform that preserves needed services, squeezes out waste and inefficiency (by the way, that’€™s why we must also fight to protect health economics research, health services research and other research that optimizes health care...
Dear Research Advocate: Last week, I wrote about the international trade deficit our country faces. This week, I’€™d like to focus on the budget deficit. From 2003 to 2011, Medicare and Medicaid spending grew 74% while our economy only grew 35%. With that kind of differential, no government can balance its budget. We need research to address disabling and costly illnesses, but that won’t be enough in and of itself to bridge the gap. We also need tax and entitlement reform that preserves needed services, squeezes out waste and inefficiency (by the way, that’€™s why we must also fight to protect health economics research, health services research and other research that optimizes health care...
Op-ed by The Honorable John Edward Porter, Research!America Chair and former U.S. Representative (1980 ’€“ 2001) published in McClatchy-Tribune newspapers , including the Great Falls Tribune , News & Observer , Times Herald Record and Billings Gazette . The health of Americans and future generations is at risk. This seems incredulous given our track record in medical discoveries that improved health care and saved lives over the years. But our nation’s research ecosystem is now in a precarious state as a result of federal policies and proposals that continue to undermine medical innovation. Sequestration, the across-the-board spending cuts for federal agencies, is a self-inflicted wound...
Op-ed by The Honorable John Edward Porter, Research!America Chair and former U.S. Representative (1980 ’€“ 2001) published in McClatchy-Tribune newspapers , including the Great Falls Tribune , News & Observer , Times Herald Record and Billings Gazette . The health of Americans and future generations is at risk. This seems incredulous given our track record in medical discoveries that improved health care and saved lives over the years. But our nation’s research ecosystem is now in a precarious state as a result of federal policies and proposals that continue to undermine medical innovation. Sequestration, the across-the-board spending cuts for federal agencies, is a self-inflicted wound...
Dear Research Advocate, “2013 is a bad year to have a good idea,” was the bleak statement Laura Niedernhofer, MD, PhD, made about the impact of sequestration in a recent FASEB report . None of us want this year, or this country, to be a bad starting point for good ideas ’€¦ but that’s what’s at stake. Think about telling someone with a serious illness that this isn’t a good year, or a good decade, for research. Think about telling them that from here on out, it may always be a bad year for a good idea. Is there hope for turning this around? We have bipartisan support and we have champions; that we need more is a reality, but by no means an impossibility. Cancer research advocates gathered...

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Without research, there is no hope.
The Honorable Paul G. Rogers