March for Science

Seven years ago, I moved to Baltimore to begin my neuroscience Ph.D. studies at Johns Hopkins University, conducting science research funded by the NIH and NSF on how brain cells form connections with one another. These networks of cells are thought to be the basis of memory, and improper network formation could lead to cognitive disorders. We have utilized our knowledge of these mechanisms to diagnose and treat a variety of disorders caused by faulty cell-to-cell connections. As a student, I also found a passion in advocating for science. To improve my own communication skills, I founded Project Bridge, a student-led organization to foster public interest in science research by connecting...
The gloomy day and rain may have stopped some people from going out and marching for science on April 22, but not me. I was ready to march along the National Mall in Washington D.C., come rain or shine. To me, the march signified the importance of science in our society from fundamental research in biology to technological advances that keep people alive. I also marched for Research!America, a nonprofit advocacy alliance working to make research for health a higher national priority. As a science policy intern at Research!America, and a researcher, I understand how critical federal funding is for research and innovation. Federal funding for scientific research hits home for me. The National...
The March for Science was a resounding success; not only in the nation’s capital but across the country and the world at numerous satellite marches. I was proud to participate in Salt Lake City’s March for Science on a beautiful April 22nd. Hundreds of people, families and friends, gathered at City Creek Park at the foot of Salt Lake’s Capitol Hill to celebrate the value that science delivers to our communities. Many marchers brought home-made signs reiterating the March’s core aims to promote “Science, not Silence,” emphasizing “Research = Hope,” and reminding us that many of the staples of our lives and health, from beer to vaccines, are brought to us thanks to Science. Marchers carried a...
Dear Research Advocate, Last weekend’s March for Science truly was a celebration and a success. That so many passionate advocates participated -- hundreds of thousands in cities across the globe (some in the pouring rain) -- was awe-inspiring. Following the March, Research!America signed onto a community statement that gives voice to the importance of continued civic engagement by scientists and our commitment to fostering that engagement. At the D.C. March, we were thrilled to see two Research!America board members, APHA executive director, Dr. Georges Benjamin, and AAAS CEO and former Congressman, Dr. Rush Holt, among the speakers, and our video up on the jumbotrons. Some Research!America...
The March for Science on April 22 in Washington, D.C. and cities across the country and abroad celebrated the countless ways science touches society and improves lives. Science has fostered many societal advances ranging from the eradication of polio to cutting-edge data technology to water quality improvements. We encourage everyone who cares about our scientific enterprise to call on policymakers to enact funding and policies to support public and private sector research. "Medical research and innovation has strong congressional bipartisan support which is a very positive sign for our research ecosystem. We strongly believe the March will further motivate scientists to engage with the...
Dear Research Advocate, This Saturday, advocates will celebrate science at events in Washington, D.C., and hundreds of cities across the globe to call attention to the value of science -- how it impacts our health, economy and planet. I encourage you to participate in the March for Science in your local communities and help us raise awareness of scientific progress. Our new video featuring one of our science fellows will be shown on jumbotrons on the National Mall in D.C. during the event. Read more about this celebration in our Board Chair’s statement , my op-ed in the Miami Herald and an LTE by Research!America’s Suzanne Ffolkes in the Hartford Courant. The March is the beginning of a...
Dear Research Advocate, The federal budget expires in 15 days. Reportedly, the ink is dry on a fiscal year 2017 (FY17) omnibus bill that includes an additional $2 billion for NIH ($1.7 billion for the base budget, and $300 million from the 21st Century Cures fund) and modest increases for most other science agencies. However, Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney tweeted this morning that the President may force a government shutdown if the bill doesn’t reflect his priorities. If ever there was a time to speak up, it’s now. We cannot condone, through our silence, OMB’s laundry list of proposed reductions to FY17 spending levels, much less the chaos of a government...
Dear Research Advocate, Congress is making progress in reauthorizing the FDA user fee programs, which is good news. According to officials at FDA, if the July 31 deadline for the “UFA” reauthorizations is missed, “reduction in force” (RIF) notices will be sent to one-third of the staff who review medical devices and a full 70% of those who review “small molecule” prescription drugs. The impact would probably be at least that dramatic for CBER, the center that reviews biologics. If the process stalls (or looks likely to), we’ll let you know and provide advocacy options! During his confirmation hearing before the Senate HELP committee yesterday, FDA Commissioner nominee Dr. Scott Gottlieb...
On April 22, I will be at the March for Science Los Angeles, engaging with fellow scientists and advocates as a biochemist and communications intern with Research!America, a nonprofit advocacy alliance, to raise awareness about the important and exciting biomedical research taking place across the country and the need for increased federal funding. The march is a celebration of the countless ways in which research and innovation impacts society and touches our daily lives. As a graduate student in biochemistry, I conducted federally-funded research at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, studying component parts to recreate the molecular machines that are at work inside our...
Dear Research Advocate, It’s official! We have joined AAAS and other prominent scientific societies to partner with the April 22, 2017 March for Science , #ScienceServes . We are excited about the heightened attention on science we have already seen. It’s also terrific to see the outpouring of commitment to making the events of the day an awakening of more civic engagement by scientists and a celebration of what science has and will accomplish. Please see our statement , read more about the event and related activities, and consider having your organization become a partner. Plan to attend in Washington, D.C. or at one of 300 sites around the nation and worldwide, with more to be announced...

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Sidebar Quote

You can change the image of things to come. But you can’t do it sitting on your hands … The science community should reach out to Congress and build bridges.
The Honorable John E. Porter