medical progress

We Need to Make that Happen Congress will be making funding decisions for all or part of FY14 in September, and it may also decide whether to eliminate, modify or simply leave in place the annual, arbitrary budget cuts known as sequestration. If we want the federal government to continue to adequately seed the research pipeline so that researchers can find treatments and cures for deadly diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’€™s, Congress needs to hear from us. Now. Tell your representatives in Congress to speak out and fight for the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the other health agencies that spur medical progress and safeguard the health...
We Need to Make that Happen Congress will be making funding decisions for all or part of FY14 in September, and it may also decide whether to eliminate, modify or simply leave in place the annual, arbitrary budget cuts known as sequestration. If we want the federal government to continue to adequately seed the research pipeline so that researchers can find treatments and cures for deadly diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’€™s, Congress needs to hear from us. Now. Tell your representatives in Congress to speak out and fight for the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the other health agencies that spur medical progress and safeguard the health...
Op-ed by The Honorable John Edward Porter, Research!America Chair and former U.S. Representative (1980 ’€“ 2001) published in McClatchy-Tribune newspapers , including the Great Falls Tribune , News & Observer , Times Herald Record and Billings Gazette . The health of Americans and future generations is at risk. This seems incredulous given our track record in medical discoveries that improved health care and saved lives over the years. But our nation’s research ecosystem is now in a precarious state as a result of federal policies and proposals that continue to undermine medical innovation. Sequestration, the across-the-board spending cuts for federal agencies, is a self-inflicted wound...
Op-ed by The Honorable John Edward Porter, Research!America Chair and former U.S. Representative (1980 ’€“ 2001) published in McClatchy-Tribune newspapers , including the Great Falls Tribune , News & Observer , Times Herald Record and Billings Gazette . The health of Americans and future generations is at risk. This seems incredulous given our track record in medical discoveries that improved health care and saved lives over the years. But our nation’s research ecosystem is now in a precarious state as a result of federal policies and proposals that continue to undermine medical innovation. Sequestration, the across-the-board spending cuts for federal agencies, is a self-inflicted wound...
Dear Research Advocate: Setting our nation’€™s sights high, rather than watching Rome burn; that’€™s the advice embedded in a recent op-ed authored by John R. Seffrin, PhD (CEO of the American Cancer Society and Research!America Board Member) and Michael Caligiuri, MD (CEO of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Center Hospital and Solove Research Institute). The authors advocate establishing a national plan, one that puts political differences aside and focuses on combating deadly and tremendously costly disease. There is a compelling argument to be made that if our nation wants to sustain a balanced budget, it must deploy a disease moonshot. If our nation...
Dear Research Advocate, Today, the Senate is planning to vote on a bipartisan continuing resolution from Sens. Mikulski and Shelby to fund the federal government through the end of the year. The good news is that the bill includes an increase, albeit small ($71 million) in NIH funding; Senator Harkin tried, unsuccessfully, unfortunately, to increase NIH even further, and Senator Durbin worked on an ambitious amendment to add more than $1.5 billion to the NIH budget. We truly appreciate the efforts of all of these champions and the fact that NIH funding was singled out for an increase on a bipartisan basis by the Appropriations Committee. The bad news is that sequestration will wipe out all...
Dear Research Advocate, With the world listening, President Obama acknowledged the importance of science, STEM education and research to our nation’€™s economic competitiveness and, more generally, to the future our children face. Many Republicans have voiced similar views. While it is heartening that policy makers on both sides of the aisle believe in research, they also must cut dollars from the federal budget. The president noted this in his speech and also mentioned the need to tame rising health care costs. The intersection of research, rising health care costs, and deficit reduction is the exact spot where advocates need to jump in. As policy makers grapple with how to control health...
Research, Industry, Academic and Patient Groups Join Forces for Week of Advocacy to Save Research, November 12-16, 2012 WASHINGTON ’€“ November 1, 2012 ’€“ Research!America, along with several dozen patient, industry, academic and health organizations, has coordinated a Week of Advocacy to Save Research for the week of November 12-16, 2012. The unified campaign is intended to convince policy makers to champion medical innovation, rather than undercut it, as decisions are made to address the ’€œfiscal cliff.’€ The campaign ’€” We Need Cures, Not Cuts ’€”is designed to raise awareness about the importance of making biomedical and health research a higher national priority. The campaign will...
Dear Research Advocate, This week’€™s Nobel Prize announcements are a fine reminder of how government-supported research plays a critical role in expanding our knowledge, leading not only to worldwide recognition but taking us closer to understanding and curing disease. The winners of the prize for chemistry, Dr. Robert Lefkowitz, Howard Hughes Medical Research investigator and professor at Duke University Medical Center, and Dr. Brian Kobilka of Stanford University School of Medicine both received grants from the National Institutes of Health, as did one of the physiology and medicine awardees, Dr. Shinya Yamanaka. They are among the many Nobel laureates whose important work throughout the...
October 3, 2012 The first Presidential debate was a missed opportunity for the candidates to outline a vision for putting research and innovation to work to improve health and strengthen the economy. Fleeting references to science and research failed to give voters confidence in this regard. We learned some things in this debate, but we are still — many of us literally — dying to know what either candidate will do to assure that research for health will be a priority for this nation. Without medical progress, driven by research and innovation, there will be no chance of controlling health care costs or assuring our nation’s continued leadership in the life sciences. We strongly urge the...

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We have health challenges in this country that science will provide answers for if given the chance and we haven't given science that opportunity
Mary Woolley, President and CEO, Research!America