medical research

by Mary Woolley, Research!America President and CEO. This entry was originally posted as a guest contribution to PhRMA’€™s Conversations forum. A shift in attitude among elected officials is necessary if this nation is to succeed in combating disease and stemming the rise of health care costs. Federal funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other agencies that conduct medical and health research has not kept pace with scientific opportunity, jeopardizing our ability to find cures for deadly disease and to maintain our global competitive edge. Medical research has not risen to the upper ranks of our nation’€™s priorities in the halls...
By Shaun O’€™Brien, co-president of the Penn Science Policy Group. O’€™Brien is a fifth-year immunology graduate student at the Perelman School of Medicine (a Research!America member). Shaun O’€™Brien In response to the need to voice the concerns of young biomedical graduates and post-docs over the federal funding climate, graduate student Mike Allegrezza founded the Science Policy Group at the University of Pennsylvania. Over the past 6 months, our group has been involved in advocacy efforts along with examining other specific issues pertaining to careers, graduate education and other hot-button issues. In terms of advocacy, the group has been very active in opposing sequestration, the...
July 9, 2013 The Senate subcommittee markup of the Labor-Health and Human Services-Education FY14 spending bill goes a step in the right direction in softening the blow sequestration has dealt to the hopes and expectations of patients and their families. Sequestration’€™s across-the-board spending cuts have sent no-confidence signals across the full ecosystem of medical research and innovation in the public and private sector. There’€™s a reason that, according to a recent national public opinion poll commissioned by Research!America, nearly half of Americans (48%) do not believe we are making enough progress in medical research in the U.S. This nation can’€™t push ahead forcefully with one...
U.S. Capitol As July 4 th approaches, we have another opportunity to contact elected officials via social media during the Congressional recess (July 1 ’€“ 5) to drive home the message that medical innovation should be protected from further cuts. Each day we will highlight a specific theme that can be customized with your statistics and patient/researcher stories. For example, on Wednesday we’€™ll focus on the drug discovery pipeline because basic research fuels private sector innovation which translates into new diagnostics, devices and products to improve the health of all Americans. Follow us on Twitter @ResearchAmerica and use the hashtag #curesnotcuts to join in the national...
We are reminded yet again why global health issues matter for Americans with recent news coverage of a possible tuberculosis outbreak at a Virginia high school that may have affected over 430 faculty and students. Health officials are recommending that all individuals at the school be tested for the disease. Tuberculosis bacteria Photo credit: CDC/ Dr. Ray Butler Historically, tuberculosis has been the world’€™s greatest infectious killer, taking an estimated billion lives over the past 200 years. Tuberculosis remains a global threat today ’€“ in 2011 alone, the disease sickened 8.7 million people. Even more alarming is the rise of drug-resistant forms of the disease. WHO estimates that...
Dear Research Advocate: Setting our nation’€™s sights high, rather than watching Rome burn; that’€™s the advice embedded in a recent op-ed authored by John R. Seffrin, PhD (CEO of the American Cancer Society and Research!America Board Member) and Michael Caligiuri, MD (CEO of the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – James Cancer Center Hospital and Solove Research Institute). The authors advocate establishing a national plan, one that puts political differences aside and focuses on combating deadly and tremendously costly disease. There is a compelling argument to be made that if our nation wants to sustain a balanced budget, it must deploy a disease moonshot. If our nation...
The TMJ Association, Ltd. (TMJA), a Research!America member, was founded in 1989 in Milwaukee, WI by two TMJ patients. The organization’€™s mission is to improve the quality of health care and lives of everyone affected by Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD), commonly called TMJ. TMD are a complex and poorly understood set of conditions characterized by pain in the jaw joint and surrounding tissues with limitation in jaw movements. TMD pain may range from mild discomfort to severe and intractable accompanied by jaw dysfunction necessitating a feeding tube for sustenance. For many sufferers, their ability to chew, swallow, make facial expressions, and even breathe is limited. It is estimated...
The United Health Foundation recently released their first-ever comprehensive report on the health of America’€™s senior population. According to a statement from the authors Reed Tuckson, MD and Rhonda Randall, DO , ’€œThe report provides a comprehensive analysis of senior population health rankings on both national and state levels, and it comes at a critical time. Americans are living longer but sicker lives, and America’€™s senior population is poised to grow 53 percent between 2015 and 2030.’€ This fascinating report ranks each state by the incidence of several factors, including obesity, physical inactivity, low-care nursing, and food insecurity. The United Health Foundation, a...
Dr. Wallace H. Coulter Coulter. Medical diagnostics. See a link? Coulter is one-half of Beckman Coulter, a Research!America member and a company that boasts nearly $6 billion in market capitalization . And that half of a multi-billion-dollar, multinational company began with research on paint for the U.S. Navy. Such unlikely beginnings are the reason that Wallace Coulter has been named the first recipient of the Golden Goose Award for 2013 . More winners will be named during the coming months. The press release announcing the award explains Coulter’€™s research: In his time away from working for various electronics companies in the 1940s, Coulter built a lab in his garage and earned a grant...
Photo credit: Smithsonian This month ’€œGenome: Unlocking Life’s Code,’€ first state-of-the-art exhibition about genome science, opened at the Museum of Natural History in partnership with the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) . The exhibit boasts cutting-edge interactives, 3D models, custom animations and engaging videos of real-life stories. According to Dr. Eric D. Green, director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), one of the 27 institutes and centers that make up the National Institutes of Health (NIH), “This exhibition reflects a remarkably productive collaboration between components of two scientific icons of the U.S. government – the Smithsonian...

Pages

Sidebar Quote

You can change the image of things to come. But you can’t do it sitting on your hands … The science community should reach out to Congress and build bridges.
The Honorable John E. Porter