neglected tropical diseases

Neglected tropical diseases, or NTDs, affect over 12 million people in the U.S. and 1.4 billion people worldwide, yet have historically received little attention. Closely linked to poverty, these diseases are often disabling or fatal if left untreated. Despite their name, they also affect a large population of those living outside the tropics, including those living in the southern U.S. Researchers at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy have created a competition for undergraduate and graduate students to bring attention to NTDs. Comprised of two challenges, this program is an innovative way to start the conversation on how best to combat diseases not given enough attention...
By Peter Hotez, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Hotez is the President of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, Director of the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development , and founding Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine . He is also Baker Institute Fellow in Disease and Poverty at Rice University, and University Professor at Baylor University, all located in the state of Texas. In honor of Public Health Thank You Day, Dr. Hotez sits down to talk about his work on neglected tropical diseases and their importance in global public health initiatives: The neglected tropical diseases or€“ the œNTDs€ are a group of tropical infections...
By Peter J. Hotez An excerpt of a blog post by Peter J. Hotez, MD, PhD, published in The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST) blog . Peter Hotez, MD, PhD is the founding dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine and professor of the Departments of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine (Research!America member) where he is also chief of a new Section of Pediatric Tropical Medicine and the Texas Children's€™s Hospital Endowed Chair of Tropical Pediatrics. Hotez is the president of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, director of the Texas Children's€™s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development and the Baker Institute Fellow...
On June 17, Research!America hosted a Capitol Hill briefing on neglected tropical diseases in partnership with Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC), The American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). Research!America also led a series of Hill meetings last week with influential congressional offices to discuss some of the successes of USAID’€™s NTD program and to highlight the need for continued investments. USAID’€™s NTD program ’€“ which was authorized by Congress in 2006 – has helped to deliver more than 580 million treatments to approximately 260 million people...
NTDs briefing On Monday, June 17, Research!America hosted a Hill briefing , ’€œThe Role of the U.S. Government and the Case for Scaling Up Treatment and Accelerating Innovation for the World’€™s Most Neglected Patients.’€ The event was sponsored by Reps. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-CA) and Karen Bass (D-CA) and hosted in partnership with Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC), The American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). Kaitlin Christenson of GHTC served as the event’€™s moderator. Other panelists included DNDi’€™s Rachel Cohen; Brian D’€™Cruz, MD, of Doctors Without...
Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a group of 17 bacterial and parasitic infections that affect more than 1.4 billion people worldwide. NTDs are both infectious and chronic and disproportionately affect people in poverty. The U.S. has played an important role in the fight against NTDs, particularly through the NTD program at USAID. Although the program is extremely successful and has delivered treatments to more than 250 million people worldwide, currently the program only focuses on five of the seventeen NTDs. The remaining twelve are often overlooked, in part because existing tools are simply not sufficient to treat these NTDs. To discuss these issues and more, please join us on...
Dear Research Advocate: According to our new national public opinion poll on clinical trials and related topics, most Americans are willing to share their personal health data to advance research, and 72% would be willing to participate in a clinical trial if recommended by their doctor. This complements what we know from other polling, i.e. that Americans want research to proceed at a pace of scientific opportunity. Yet we continue to lose ground in the gridlocked political environment, which, by its inaction, is dashing the hopes of patients and families anxious for new therapies and cures. What’€™s wrong with this picture? It isn’€™t as though research hasn’€™t yielded both societal and...
Dear Research Advocate: Yesterday, President Obama tweeted about the effects of sequestration on medical research. From @barackobama, “The #sequester is slowing the pace of medical research, delaying the discovery of cures and treatments. Read more .” It is terrific that the president is helping drive increased attention to medical research. Our thanks to him and also to all who have joined our Memorial Day recess week of social media advocacy . The American Heart Association posted this great image to its Facebook page; we also thank Society for Neuroscience , BIO , The Endocrine Society , Melanoma Research Alliance , University of Maryland School of Medicine , CURE Epilepsy and UPenn...
On May 15, Research!America hosted a forum, ’€œNeglected Tropical Disease Research in Louisiana: Saving Lives and Creating Jobs.’€ The forum, featuring leading NTD experts from the region, was held at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans. Pierre Buekens, MD, PhD, dean of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, addresses forum attendees. Pierre Buekens, MD, PhD, dean of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, made opening remarks. He set the scene for the day, reminding us that there is a false divide between global and domestic health. Dr. Buekens pointed out that borders don’€™t matter when...
Leading researchers discuss emerging health threats at panel discussion During a panel discussion today at Tulane University’€™s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, hosted by Research!America, several researchers and leading public health experts said the nation must increase public awareness and research to address the emergence of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in the U.S. NTDs, commonly associated with the developing world, have recently been identified in many parts of the country including Louisiana. Factors such as increased globalization, trade, migration, urban sprawl or climate change have been cited as potential underlying causes for the emergence of NTDs in the U.S...

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