NIH funding

Cardiovascular disease – including stroke – is the top killer of women, said Dr. Maria Duca of Virtua Health System Cardiology Group during a February 6 Women and Heart Health briefing organized by WomenHeart and the American Heart Association . “We are dying less in the last several years but we are still dying more than men,” Duca said. “It’s a women’s disease.” The briefing was one of many events that will take place nationwide in observance of American Heart Month in February. In particular, WomenHeart sought to educate women about their unique cardiovascular disease risk factors and provide them with the appropriate steps to take in addressing those factors. “Our mission is to empower...
More than 100 million Americans live with the devastating effects of a debilitating neurological or psychiatric disease each year. In addition to producing severe hardship for millions of families, such suffering costs the U.S. economy at least $760 billion annually. The Society for Neuroscience (SfN), the world’s largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system, believes that the only way to foster the scientific breakthroughs needed to alleviate that suffering is with strong, consistent and reliable public funding of biomedical research through agencies including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science...
Dear Research Advocate: This week’€™s CDC announcement of the worst-case Ebola scenario is staggering. Saying, ’€œLet’€™s be honest with ourselves ’€¦’€ President Obama addressed the UN this morning on the escalating threat posed by Ebola, urging world leaders to work together to address this truly global crisis. The Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) program, which received additional funding for Ebola drug development as part of the recently passed continuing resolution (CR), is a terrific example of how the public and private sectors can work together to develop drugs for national and global health threats like Ebola. BARDA provides market incentives so that...
Op-ed by The Honorable John Edward Porter, Research!America Chair and former U.S. Representative (1980 ’€“ 2001) published in McClatchy-Tribune newspapers , including the Great Falls Tribune , News & Observer , Times Herald Record and Billings Gazette . The health of Americans and future generations is at risk. This seems incredulous given our track record in medical discoveries that improved health care and saved lives over the years. But our nation’s research ecosystem is now in a precarious state as a result of federal policies and proposals that continue to undermine medical innovation. Sequestration, the across-the-board spending cuts for federal agencies, is a self-inflicted wound...
Op-ed by The Honorable John Edward Porter, Research!America Chair and former U.S. Representative (1980 ’€“ 2001) published in McClatchy-Tribune newspapers , including the Great Falls Tribune , News & Observer , Times Herald Record and Billings Gazette . The health of Americans and future generations is at risk. This seems incredulous given our track record in medical discoveries that improved health care and saved lives over the years. But our nation’s research ecosystem is now in a precarious state as a result of federal policies and proposals that continue to undermine medical innovation. Sequestration, the across-the-board spending cuts for federal agencies, is a self-inflicted wound...
Op-ed by Abigail Schindler, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington , Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and co-leader of the Seattle Forum on Science Ethics and Policy published in The Seattle Times . When I think about not being a scientist anymore my heart hurts. But sadly, due to continued budget cuts to biomedical research, within the next few years that is most likely exactly what I will be ’€” no longer a scientist, no longer a researcher searching for cures for disease. And I am not alone. The number of young scientists being forced out of basic biomedical research in the United States is increasing at an alarming rate, and when this next generation of...
Dear Research Advocate: Budget Uncertainty Deepens The House Appropriations Committee has postponed this week’€™s scheduled consideration of the Labor-Health and Human Services (Labor-H) funding measure. A New York Times article indicated that the bill protects NIH funding; but, given how low the overall spending number is for Labor-H, “protected” is most likely interpreted as the NIH being cut less than other agencies, themselves highly valued. The distance between the Senate (passed) and House (estimated) Labor-H appropriations ’€” in excess of 20% ’€” sets the stage for another continuing resolution (CR). What actually does happen next is uncertain, which is why advocacy is essential...
Op-ed by Abigail Schindler, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington , Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and co-leader of the Seattle Forum on Science Ethics and Policy published in The Seattle Times . When I think about not being a scientist anymore my heart hurts. But sadly, due to continued budget cuts to biomedical research, within the next few years that is most likely exactly what I will be ’€” no longer a scientist, no longer a researcher searching for cures for disease. And I am not alone. The number of young scientists being forced out of basic biomedical research in the United States is increasing at an alarming rate, and when this next generation of...
Dear Research Advocate: Budget Uncertainty Deepens The House Appropriations Committee has postponed this week’€™s scheduled consideration of the Labor-Health and Human Services (Labor-H) funding measure. A New York Times article indicated that the bill protects NIH funding; but, given how low the overall spending number is for Labor-H, “protected” is most likely interpreted as the NIH being cut less than other agencies, themselves highly valued. The distance between the Senate (passed) and House (estimated) Labor-H appropriations ’€” in excess of 20% ’€” sets the stage for another continuing resolution (CR). What actually does happen next is uncertain, which is why advocacy is essential...
By William (Bill) R. Brinkley, Ph.D., TAMEST’€™s 2012 President Sometimes you find luck sitting by your side at the most opportune of moments. For example, what would you do if you suddenly found yourself seated next to a key member of the U.S. Congress on a two and a half hour flight to Washington, D.C.? Be prepared, it could happen to you! If you are a frequent traveler like me, you probably prefer to read, daydream or sleep on most flights. But what would you do if you suddenly recognized that your seat mate was a VIP’€”say, a key member of the U.S. Senate or House of Representatives? You might recognize it as a terrific opportunity to put in a good word for particular issues of great...

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Funding research gives all of us a better chance of living a healthier life.
Pam Hirata, heart disease survivor