NIH

Research!America’€™s newest fact sheet series highlights the personal stories of medical research and the importance of increasing the NIH budget in FY15. We hope you will share these fact sheets with your representatives or congressional candidates, or take it with you on Hill or in-district visits. No one who reads these stories can doubt the significance of medical progress. A stronger investment in research is needed now more than ever! Here are their stories: John Hudson Dilgen, Epidermolysis Bullosa Steve DeWitte, Parkinson’s disease Victor Medina, Traumatic Brain Injury Carrie Scott, Multiple Sclerosis Max Hasenauer, X-linked agammaglobulinemia Michael Moskowitz, non-Hodgkin’s...
Excerpt of an op-ed by Society for Neuroscience Early Career Science Policy Fellow Matthew J. Robson, PhD, published in The Tennessean . The United States has historically been a consistent, international force of innovation and advancement in biomedical research. Such research is not possible without federal funding of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services. Although the NIH supports basic biomedical research aimed at a greater understanding of the causes of disease and the improved health of all Americans, relatively few understand the scope of the accomplishments of this agency. Research that depends upon NIH funding has...
Dear Research Advocate: This week, the research advocacy community suffered a tremendous loss. John Rehm , husband of Diane Rehm, passed away Monday. Diane, the host of The Diane Rehm Show on NPR, was honored by Research!America last year for her advocacy with the Isadore Rosenfeld Award for Impact on Public Opinion . Her late husband was a friend and longtime supporter of the Parkinson’€™s disease community. Our thoughts are with the Rehm family during this difficult time. As you pursue your advocacy efforts, we hope the newest fact sheet in our series about the human impact of research will prove useful. Max Hasenauer was diagnosed at 22-months-old with X-linked Agammaglobulinemia (XLA)...
Federally-funded research projects that have advanced medical innovation will be on full display at the BIO International Convention Innovation Zone June 23 ’€“ 26 in San Diego. Among the new technologies, a device to prevent secondary cataract formation developed with a National Institutes of Health SBIR grant awarded to Sharklet Technologies , Inc. Secondary cataract, a serious complication of cataract surgery, occurs in 25% to 50% of patients. This complication requires a follow-up laser treatment which presents an additional risk to patients and adds more than $300 million in medical costs per year in the U.S. The novel device, a micro-patterned membrane designed to be integrated into a...
Image credit: National Institutes of Health Technological advances have paved the way for researchers to access a wealth of data about the biological cause of disease. Yet translating these discoveries into treatments remains a challenge. Promising drugs often fail in late phase clinical trials, costing time and money, and leaving patients’€™ lives hanging in the balance. One reason is that the right biological targets were not chosen from the start. To improve the current model for developing new diagnostics and treatments, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and several biopharmaceutical companies and non-profit organizations formed the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP), www...
The increase for the National Institutes of Health is a step in the right direction to accelerate medical progress but we cannot sustain our nation’s engine of discovery with dollops of fuel; a more robust investment is critical to maintaining our pre-eminence in science and saving lives. Researchers are closer to understanding ways to effectively treat and prevent Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, diabetes and other health threats that exact a tremendous financial and emotional toll on patients and their families. Yet federal funding has failed to keep pace with the level of scientific opportunity, and Americans are aware of the disconnect. More than half of those surveyed say elected officials...
Dear Research Advocate: Today, Chairwoman Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) released the Senate’€™s 302(b) allocations , which were approved by the Appropriations Committee. As you know from last week, the House 302(b) allocation for the Labor-HHS subcommittee is approximately $1 billion less in fiscal year 2015 than it was in FY 14.The Senate’€™s allocation for FY 15 is roughly the same as it was in FY 14. The bottom line is that, as expected, we have our work cut out for us to achieve the increases needed for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and our nation’€™s other health research agencies. Fortunately, Senator Mikulski and other leaders from both sides of the aisle understand the...
Dear Research Advocate: Congress continues to pay particular attention to – and make decisions bearing on – the pace of medical progress. To briefly count the ways: The Senate Labor-HHS Appropriations subcommittee heard testimony yesterday from agency heads within HHS about the significance of health-related spending, including spending on medical and health research. Read our written testimony here . Congressman Upton (R-MI-06), the Chair of the House Energy and Commerce Committee (which has jurisdiction over authorizing legislation for NIH, CDC, FDA and AHRQ) and Congresswoman Diana DeGette (D-CO-01), a member of the Committee, launched their 21st Century Cures initiative with a...
Remember that all day tomorrow, Tuesday May 6, is a social media Day of Action in conjunction with the Medical Progress NOW campaign. Join us on Twitter (#medprogressnow) and Facebook as advocates from around the nation ask Congress to focus on what can be done this year to accelerate medical progress, first and foremost by committing to a meaningful increase in funding for the National Institutes of Health in the FY15 appropriations process. Share personal stories, relevant data and compelling visuals to make the case that insufficient funding costs lives. Congress has the power to get NIH funding back on track. Help convince them to do it. And please spread the word and share the link to...
Dear Research Advocate: In recognition of his many accomplishments as a champion for research, Research!America Chair and former Congressman John Edward Porter was honored by the National Academy of Sciences with the Public Welfare Medal, the Academy’€™s most prestigious award. This well-deserved acknowledgment of Porter’€™s tireless efforts to advance innovation and engage scientists in advocacy should motivate advocates to follow his lead and speak up about threats to our nation’€™s research ecosystem. Read our statement on the award ceremony here . In his remarks , Mr. Porter noted that ’€œpolitical judgment should never be allowed to be substituted for scientific judgment.’€ This point...

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Funding research gives all of us a better chance of living a healthier life.
Pam Hirata, heart disease survivor