polls

Op-ed by The Honorable John Edward Porter, Research!America Chair and former U.S. Representative (1980 ’€“ 2001) published in McClatchy-Tribune newspapers , including the Great Falls Tribune , News & Observer , Times Herald Record and Billings Gazette . The health of Americans and future generations is at risk. This seems incredulous given our track record in medical discoveries that improved health care and saved lives over the years. But our nation’s research ecosystem is now in a precarious state as a result of federal policies and proposals that continue to undermine medical innovation. Sequestration, the across-the-board spending cuts for federal agencies, is a self-inflicted wound...
Op-ed by The Honorable John Edward Porter, Research!America Chair and former U.S. Representative (1980 ’€“ 2001) published in McClatchy-Tribune newspapers , including the Great Falls Tribune , News & Observer , Times Herald Record and Billings Gazette . The health of Americans and future generations is at risk. This seems incredulous given our track record in medical discoveries that improved health care and saved lives over the years. But our nation’s research ecosystem is now in a precarious state as a result of federal policies and proposals that continue to undermine medical innovation. Sequestration, the across-the-board spending cuts for federal agencies, is a self-inflicted wound...
A Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this month shows a staggering 400% increase in the number of women who died from a prescription painkiller overdose from 1999 to 2010. The rate of men’€™s deaths in that same category, meanwhile, rose 265% ’€” a depressing number in its own right. But the 400% increase in women means that in 2010, according to the CDC’€™s calculations, 6,600 women lost their lives because of a prescription painkiller overdose; that’€™s 18 women every day. That’€™s four times the number of deaths attributed to cocaine and heroin combined. And once every 3 minutes, an ER somewhere in America sees a woman for problems resulting...
A Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this month shows a staggering 400% increase in the number of women who died from a prescription painkiller overdose from 1999 to 2010. The rate of men’€™s deaths in that same category, meanwhile, rose 265% ’€” a depressing number in its own right. But the 400% increase in women means that in 2010, according to the CDC’€™s calculations, 6,600 women lost their lives because of a prescription painkiller overdose; that’€™s 18 women every day. That’€™s four times the number of deaths attributed to cocaine and heroin combined. And once every 3 minutes, an ER somewhere in America sees a woman for problems resulting...
Dear Research Advocate: Our elected representatives know they must make hard tax and entitlement reform decisions, and, for the sake of the nation, ensure those decisions foster economic growth and societal progress. Part of that equation is federal funding for medical research sufficient to capitalize on unprecedented scientific opportunity and tackle urgent threats like Alzheimer’€™s Disease. As I’€™ve highlighted before, a majority of Americans say they are willing to pay additional taxes ’€” $1 more per week (which amounts to approximately $4.4 billion annually) ’€” if they knew those dollars were funding medical research. The public is on our side with their wallets as well as their...
Dear Research Advocate: Our elected representatives know they must make hard tax and entitlement reform decisions, and, for the sake of the nation, ensure those decisions foster economic growth and societal progress. Part of that equation is federal funding for medical research sufficient to capitalize on unprecedented scientific opportunity and tackle urgent threats like Alzheimer’€™s Disease. As I’€™ve highlighted before, a majority of Americans say they are willing to pay additional taxes ’€” $1 more per week (which amounts to approximately $4.4 billion annually) ’€” if they knew those dollars were funding medical research. The public is on our side with their wallets as well as their...
Spain’€™s economy was harshly affected by the 2008 financial crisis and, later, the eurozone crisis. (Just this week, the country’€™s budget minister said Spain has reached a turning point and may at last be emerging from its financial troubles.) Its efforts to slash government spending left few unaffected, and a recent article by Agence France-Presse detailed the effects on Spanish researchers. The Prince Felipe Research Center, in the coastal city of Valencia, lost around half of its funding from the Spanish government; as a result, it closed half of its 28 labs and let go 114 workers. María Jesus Vicent told the wire service that her lab had made great strides in prostate cancer...
Only Small Percentage say Health Care Professionals Have Ever Talked to Them about Medical Research ALEXANDRIA, Va. – June 12, 2013 – More than two-thirds (72%) of Americans say it’s likely they would participate in a clinical trial if recommended by their doctor, but only 22% say a doctor or other health care professional has ever talked to them about medical research, according to a new national public opinion poll commissioned by Research!America. A wide majority (80%) say they have heard of a clinical trial – more than half (53%) through the Internet and only 24% from a doctor or other health care provider. Only 16% of those polled say they or someone in their family have ever...
Dear Research Advocate, The President’€™s budget is out and it’€™s a mixed bag. First, the good news. NSF was given a significant funding boost, $593M over 2012 levels, NIH funding was increased by $470M, and AHRQ, via budget trade-offs, looks to have been boosted by $64M. The increases are from FY12 to FY14, since the President’s budget replaces sequestration in a different way than either Congressional body (see more below). The not so good news in the President’s budget is that other health research agencies did not fare well. The CDC budget was cut deeply, especially prevention programs. FDA was essentially flat -funded. And entitlement-reform may pose a challenge to innovation. The...
Dear Research Advocate, To say that the attention paid to sequestration is extraordinary is to understate the case, but there has not been enough public outcry to force meaningful congressional action. It is highly unlikely that a rabbit will be pulled out of a hat between now and 11:59 p.m. tomorrow night. Damage will be done, and meanwhile the political playing field switches to a new month and new, related and ever-deepening crises. Possibly the only good news is that the media has ratcheted up coverage of the impact of sequestration on medical research, with stories about ’€œcuts on top of cuts on top of cuts,’€ in the words of Eric Hoffman of Children’€™s National Medical Center, one...

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Sidebar Quote

You can change the image of things to come. But you can’t do it sitting on your hands … The science community should reach out to Congress and build bridges.
The Honorable John E. Porter