prevention

Dear Research Advocate, On Tuesday, I had the great honor of attending the bill signing for the 21st Century Cures Act (21stCC). It was particularly meaningful that this bill crossed the finish line during Vice President Biden’s tenure. His determination to deliver other families from the cancer tragedy experienced by his own lent a special strength to our collective efforts over a protracted period of congressional debate. If we continue to channel the Vice President’s level of commitment and determination, we can ensure that achieving faster medical progress remains at the forefront of national priorities. As you know (but it never hurts to reaffirm), it is important, but not sufficient,...
In an exclusive Q&A, Lynn Goldman, M.D., MPH, Michael and Lori Milken Dean of Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University talks to Research!America about the achievements and gaps in the field of public health . You’ve published a paper as part of the Institute of Medicine’s Vital Directions initiative that says we have a long way to go to strengthen our public health system. Why is a strong public health system so important? Despite the fact that we spend a disproportionate amount of our GDP per capita on health and health care in this country, we do not enjoy the highest level of health as measured by basic metrics like life expectancy and infant...
Good health begins with people understanding the importance of prevention and lifestyle. In order to advocate for prevention in their communities, schools and cities, it is important for individuals to know how to keep themselves and others healthy through adequate diet and physical activity, by avoiding smoking, by drinking only in moderation, and by getting regular medical checkups. The idea that avoiding and preventing disease is a lot better than suffering with disease usually resonates well with the general public. However, prevention must connect behaviors now with what may be avoided later, and often needs to occur in the absence of illness or any similar motivation. For example,...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday, November 21, 2016. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit www.publichealththankyouday.org for more information. “We can look back on the whole history of public health and see that environmental health is very at much the center of it,” said Tee Guidotti, M.D., MPH, president of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Honor Society. “When public health was organized for the modern era in the 1850s, environmental health was one of the first areas to be codified into new public health acts, because that era was quite dangerous...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday, November 21, 2016. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit www.publichealththankyouday.org for more information. It’s that time of year again – flu season is here. Unlike the common cold, influenza is a serious and highly contagious disease that tends to develop quickly. Many people think “it’s just the flu”, but sadly, the flu can lead to hospitalization and death, even in healthy individuals. As a parent who lost her healthy five-year-old son to the flu, I want everyone to understand how critically important it is for...
In the U.S., it is estimated that 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women will develop cancer in their lifetime even though 50% of cancer deaths are preventable. The Bipartisan Policy Center (BPC) and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network hosted a panel on Friday, September 30 in Washington, D.C. on the future of cancer prevention with top public health experts. “We cannot achieve the full potential in our cancer fight unless we embrace and implement everything we have learned about prevention,” said Dr. Richard Wender, the American Cancer Society’s Chief Cancer Control Officer, and keynote speaker. Of the 26% decline in cancer death rates among women in the United States from 1930-2012, he...
Dear Research Advocate: As we grieve the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the spectre of more to come is deeply troubling. If there were ever a time for action by our elected officials, surely this is it. Yesterday, Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) took to the Senate floor in a nearly 15 hour filibuster to demand action on gun reform, which ended in Republican leadership agreeing to a vote on two pieces of legislation related to gun sales. Senator Murphy was joined by many of his colleagues, including Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL), who said that the American Medical Association’s declaration of gun violence as a public health crisis is “historic,” entering their press release into the record...
Dear Research Advocate: In the multi-faceted context of discouraging new data that shows an increasing incidence of suicide, rapidly rising prescription drug abuse, and widespread pain and suffering due to the heroin epidemic, the House is working on legislation to address opioid abuse , approving more than a dozen bills that will be packaged and considered on the floor in early May. This is important bipartisan progress in combating challenges of frightening scope, extending beyond addressing addiction and abuse to effectively meeting the challenge of chronic pain. Even as we commit to working harder to activate what we know works in terms of prevention and treatment, we must learn much...
President Obama’s decree proclaiming April 4 – 10 National Public Health Week focuses on several key objective: stemming the tide of infectious disease like Zika; improving access to healthcare domestically and globally; promoting healthy behaviors in adolescents; preventing opioid and illicit drug abuse; decreasing gun violence; addressing climate change-related health issues; and improving access to mental health resources. National Public Health week is an opportunity to reflect on the pivotal role public health research and practice play in advancing the wellbeing of Americans and populations across the globe, and recognize the individuals, organizations and agencies that carry out...
As many as one-half of all cancers are preventable based on what we already understand. Despite many promising and innovative new therapies, cancer prevention remains “Plan A,” our first and best hope to reduce the burden of this disease. I recently shared key points of this plan, described below, in a June 1, 2015 lecture at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. At The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center , we established the cancer prevention and control platform within the Moon Shots program. Our mission is to develop and implement evidence-based actions in cancer prevention, screening, early detection and survivorship in clinical and community settings to...

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We have health challenges in this country that science will provide answers for if given the chance and we haven't given science that opportunity
Mary Woolley, President and CEO, Research!America