prevention

As many as one-half of all cancers are preventable based on what we already understand. Despite many promising and innovative new therapies, cancer prevention remains “Plan A,” our first and best hope to reduce the burden of this disease. I recently shared key points of this plan, described below, in a June 1, 2015 lecture at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. At The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center , we established the cancer prevention and control platform within the Moon Shots program. Our mission is to develop and implement evidence-based actions in cancer prevention, screening, early detection and survivorship in clinical and community settings to...
This week, communities across the country are celebrating National Public Health Week . This annual observance recognizes the invaluable work public health professionals contribute to keeping our communities healthy and safe. It also reminds us of the importance of prevention in ensuring the health of our nation. We face a growing burden of chronic disease that is clearly unsustainable. Largely preventable conditions like heart disease, diabetes and stroke are taking too great a toll in lives and investments lost. We must reduce rates of disease and disability if we hope to create a healthier nation. Conducting research that promotes health and prevents disease is an important step in the...
Excerpt of article by Derek Yach, MBChB, MPH, The Vitality Institute, The Vitality Group, LLC, New York, New York and Chris Calitz, MPP, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The focus of medical research has historically been on curative medicine, yielding better drugs, medical devices, and clinical procedures. Prevention science’€”the systematic application of scientific methods to the causes and prevention of diseases in populations’€”has yet to receive the necessary investment and support required to reduce the growing burden of largely preventable noncommunicable diseases (...
By Frederick Rivara, MD, MPH. Rivara is President of Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research (SAVIR). Dr. Rivara holds the Children’s Guild Association Endowed Chair in Pediatrics, and is a University of Washington professor of pediatrics and an adjunct professor of epidemiology. He is also Editor of JAMA Pediatrics. Frederick Rivara, MD, MPH More than 400 public health researchers and practitioners participated in the 2013 National Meeting of the Society for Advancement of Violence and Injury Research (SAVIR) and Safe States Alliance . Hosted in Baltimore by the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy , this event focused on how research and practice have...
left to right: Mary Woolley, president and CEO, Research!America; Jack T. Watters, MD, Research!America Board member and VP for External Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc.; and U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, MD, at Research!America’€™s 2012 Advocacy Awards Dinner Surgeon General Regina Benjamin, MD, recently announced her resignation as the nation’€™s top doctor after four years in the post. Dr. Benjamin, the 18th surgeon general, has been an active advocate for public health with a special interest in disease prevention, smoking cessation and healthy lifestyles. ’€œShe has been a remarkable advocate in promoting the value of prevention as a national health priority. She forged the way as...
February 26, 2013 The Board of Directors of Research!America joins me in extending our deepest condolences to Dr. C. Everett Koop’€™s family, friends and colleagues as we mourn the passing of a visionary leader and champion of medical research. Dr. Koop was well-respected and revered by scientists, the public health community and the public at large, thanks to his unceasing commitment to strengthening government support for research to address health threats. As U.S. Surgeon General, he was known as ’€œAmerica’€™s Family Doctor.’€ Notably, by promoting fitness and raising awareness of disease prevention and immunization, he encouraged individuals to take an active role in their health ...
It started in Tennessee: one patient with an unusual recurrence of meningitis. An infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University worked the case like a detective, tracking down a lead. When the detective work led to an unusual suspect ’€“ a possible contamination ’€“ the Tennessee Department of Health was promptly notified. And when Tennessee public health specialists feared the contamination might be widespread, they contacted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In short order, a second federal agency, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and most states in the eastern half of the country were working to solve a puzzling fungal meningitis outbreak that affected...
Dear Research Advocate, Today, the Supreme Court surprised many in upholding most aspects of the Affordable Care Act. As the pundits and the blogosphere stoke continuing debate, candidates will stake out positions and policy makers will consider next steps. And everyone will have a point of view. As you express yours, I urge you to use a communication ’€œbridge’€ to talk about the future of health and health care not only as an outcome of a court or legislative action, but as an outcome of research. Because of research, we live longer lives, death rates from heart disease have declined by 65% over the past 30 years, we don’€™t consider childhood cancer or HIV/AIDS a death sentence, and we...

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The capabilities are enormous, a little bit of research can pay off quite a bit in the long run.
Paul D’ Addario, retinitis pigmentosa patient