public health

On April 8, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in response to the H7N9 influenza outbreak in China. H7N9 is the newest bird flu virus and has killed 8 and infected 20 other individuals in China. No cases have been found outside China, but the global health community, including CDC, is concerned because this is the first time this type of bird flu has been found in humans. In general, the EOC monitors emergency responses to public health threats and now that the center has been activated, more CDC resources will be devoted to monitoring the H7N9 outbreak. The EOC will provide ’€œresources, logistical support and avenues of...
The public health community is on alert over a new strain of avian flu that has made the jump from birds to people, resulting in six confirmed deaths in China. ’€œAt this point it’€™s a matter of anxious waiting and good surveillance,’€ Research!America Board member Georges Benjamin, MD, executive director of the American Public Health Association, told Politico Pro. Scientists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are joining forces with other international researchers to track this new strain, H7N9. Thus far, the only infected individuals appear to have come into direct contact with sick birds, indicating that currently this new strain cannot be passed from person to person...
Join the American Public Health Association for a live Twitter chat at 2pm ET on Wednesday, April 3 as part of the activities for National Public Health Week. Engage with fellow public health advocates on important topics you care about. The hour-long chat will focus on the value of public health and its return on investment in our communities. Follow #NPHWchat on Twitter to participate in the discussion about ways in which evidence-based disease prevention and health promotion initiatives can save lives and money. You can also follow National Public Health Week and Research!America on Twitter.
April 1-7 is National Public Health Week. The theme for NPHW this year highlights the return on investment we all get from public health initiatives. Resources from the American Public Health Association outline a unique focus for each day this week to show how multifaceted public health issues are impacting our lives at home, at school, in the workplace, while we travel and in our communities. How does public health help you? With rapidly rising medical care costs, controlling this area of both our national and personal budgets is a key concern. Not to mention the improvement to our quality of life that results from healthier individuals and communities. Public health research has shown...
It’€™s all over the news: The federal government is headed for significant, across-the-board budget cuts. Sequestration, or 10 years of automatic spending cuts, is a self-inflicted consequence passed by Congress, aimed to be a drastic outcome of failing to agree on a federal deficit-reduction package. Some Members of Congress argue that the sequester will not have a significant impact; they claim that the 5.1% cuts made in 2013 are only a drop in the bucket and there is no need to worry. However, the amount of money that the National Institutes of Health will lose, $1.56 billion, could fund the entire National Institute of Mental Health for more than a year. Cuts to the National Science...
The impact of sequestration will translate into reduced local and state funding to protect your health and safety. In a recent CQ article ( CDC Director Frieden Predicts Local Public Health Cuts Under Sequester ’€“ subscription required), CDC Director Thomas Frieden reminded us that the vast majority of the agency’€™s funding goes out to local and state health departments. These frontline health providers identify and protect us from threats like the flu, foodborne outbreaks, contaminated water, road traffic injuries, and new pathogens. The problem is that we don’€™t know what we’€™re missing until it’€™s too late because these frontline health workers are usually silent heroes. Take action...
Dear Research Advocate, Progress toward a deal to avert the fiscal cliff seems now to have been reversed, with talk today of reintroducing aspects of the Ryan budget ’€” more severe than sequestration. Holidays or not, this is no time to let up on our individual and collective advocacy for research. Reps. Fudge (D-OH) and Stivers (R-OH) are leading a bipartisan sign-on letter , urging Congress to take into account the critical importance of NIH in any deficit reduction plan. Take action and urge your representatives to sign on! For those of you in Ohio, if you would like to thank Reps. Fudge and Stivers for their efforts, you may obtain their contact information here . In addition to...
Dear Research Advocate, Congress is back and there is talk of more stalemate, with support wavering for a deal to avert the fiscal cliff before the end of the year. Speaker John Boehner said early today that ’€œno substantive progress has been made’€ on negotiations. Amazingly, inaction (going over the cliff) remains a possibility. The more likely scenario is a short-term fix that leaves the major decisions in the hands of the next Congress. In the midst of behind-the-scenes negotiations between congressional leadership and the White House, appropriators are talking about finalizing their bills before the end of the lame-duck session rather than waiting to revisit the current continuing...
It started in Tennessee: one patient with an unusual recurrence of meningitis. An infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University worked the case like a detective, tracking down a lead. When the detective work led to an unusual suspect ’€“ a possible contamination ’€“ the Tennessee Department of Health was promptly notified. And when Tennessee public health specialists feared the contamination might be widespread, they contacted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In short order, a second federal agency, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and most states in the eastern half of the country were working to solve a puzzling fungal meningitis outbreak that affected...
Public Health Thank You Day, November 19, 2012 WASHINGTON, DC ’€”November 15, 2012’€”On the Monday before Thanksgiving, Research!America and leading U.S. public health organizations recognize public health professionals who work tirelessly every day to protect the health of all Americans. Public Health Thank You Day 2012 honors all those unsung heroes who keep our drinking water safe and air clean, develop vaccines, track and contain deadly illnesses and aid victims of devastating natural disasters. These everyday heroes include health inspectors, environmental health scientists, public health researchers, sanitation workers and many other dedicated workers. ’€œIn recent weeks, the nation...

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