research

Postdoctoral researchers (postdocs) comprise a large part of the scientific community and have been instrumental in many scientific advances. Unfortunately, there is currently no nationwide standard to guide how they are mentored as they transition to the working world. This needs to change. Since its inception in the 1920s, postdoc training has gone through several changes, and there are currently many variations in how it is carried out, but the primary objectives remain the same: to give new Ph.D. scientists direct mentorship and hands-on experience as they transition to tenure-track faculty positions, and to free up time for professors to teach, complete administrative tasks and write...
Dr. Barbara McCrady recalls interviewing a woman who used to pass out on her bed before her husband came home from work. Suspecting something was amiss, the couple spent two years visiting sleep specialists and neurologists. Nobody suspected that the cause of her early slumbers was alcohol. The woman was drinking one liter of alcohol per day. McCrady, distinguished professor of psychology, University of New Mexico and Director, Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions, was among the speakers for a congressional briefing titled, The Changing Patterns of Women’s Drinking and Their Impact on Public Health, at the Rayburn House Office Building on June 22, 2017. “This underscores...
In the 18 months since former President Barack Obama announced the Cancer Moonshot Initiative (CMI), led by then-Vice President Joseph Biden, great strides have been made in the mission to accelerate the pace of cancer research. Among the goals of the initiative is to increase collaboration between public- and private-sector organizations, and government agencies to develop new methods of targeting cancer. CMI’s emphasis on innovation – specifically immunotherapy – and new approaches to research are especially important for rare cancers such as mesothelioma because traditional research and treatment methods often do not work. Immunotherapy, which uses a person’s own immune system to help...
At the Alzheimer’s Association, we launched a bold campaign titled “The First Survivor.” The ad shares our unwavering vision of achieving a goal that is not yet possible – having someone survive Alzheimer’s disease. Perhaps you’ve seen it. The ad describes a future state – but one that can’t come soon enough for the Alzheimer’s Association or the 5.5 million Americans living with the disease and their families. Today though, Alzheimer’s is fatal. There are no survivors. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. and the only leading cause that cannot be prevented, cured or even slowed. Since 2000, deaths from Alzheimer’s disease have increased 89 percent; while deaths associated...
Research!America will host an interactive panel discussion on June 20 titled, A World Without Disease: Can We Get There? , at the BIO International Convention in San Diego, California. During the session, experts from the regulatory, pharmaceutical, and advocacy sectors will discuss the implications of new technologies and the challenges of leveraging limited resources to maximize patient benefit. Research!America’s session will seek to address the question, “how can we capitalize on insights from the biotechnology industry and facilitate a coordinated effort to eradicate disease?”. To do so, Research!America board member William Hait, M.D., Ph.D. , global head at Janssen Research and...
The Palliative Care Research Cooperative Group (PCRC) conducts high-impact palliative care research to help improve quality of life for patients with life-threatening conditions. One example of the PCRC’s research is a recent randomized controlled trial which found that discontinuing statins among patients in the last three months of life did not significantly change survival rates. In fact, patients whose statins were discontinued reported higher quality of life and lower costs than those who continued taking the drugs. This study directly impacted care by guiding clinicians on how to develop statin regimens for patients near the end of life. "Most of the studies focus on when to start a...
Dear Research Advocate, OMB has recommended cuts to FY17 appropriations , which would precede, if you will, the proposed FY18 cuts. As noted in our statement , these proposed cuts contradict worthy goals the President established for his tenure in office. They also fly in the face of public opinion. Fortunately, it appears Congress is not playing ball . Please use this editable message to say no to reductions and yes to passage of an FY17 omnibus bill. Reliable sources say the bill includes a $2 billion boost for NIH, as well as increases for CDC, FDA and NSF. The media is chock-full of commentary and quotes supporting investment in research and public health. A masterful Washington Post op...
“We are on the cusp of a major breakthrough in medical progress, this is not a time to let up, it’s a time to redouble our efforts,” said Joe Biden , 47th Vice President of the United States, in his remarks at Research!America’s 21st Advocacy Awards Dinner on March 15. “We can make sure many more chronic diseases don’t cost you your life, but only if we break down barriers. I see the day a patient is given the right therapy the first time when they are diagnosed. I see the day when prevention is more effective, and where care is personalized and more effective with less side effects.” Former Vice President Biden received the Gordon and Llura Gund Leadership Award for his commitment to...
Gregg Gordon was 44 and the picture of health until he suddenly became excessively tired and noticed two small bumps on his shin. A visit to his doctor led to a startling cancer diagnosis, and less than 24 hours later he was receiving chemotherapy to treat acute myeloid leukemia. When standard treatments failed, Gregg’s best hope was a bone marrow transplant, but he could not find a donor match. Fortunately, he was referred to Colleen Delaney, M.D., in Seattle, who had developed a process for expanding stem cells from umbilical cord blood for use in patients without donors. As The Washington Post reported in September 2016, the procedure was a success and Gregg has been cancer-free for five...
January is Glaucoma Awareness Month, and March 12-17 will be World Glaucoma Week (WGW) with events held around the globe, including an Alliance for Eye and Vision Research (AEVR) Congressional Briefing on March 9 at noon in House Rayburn Office Building 2040 in Washington, D.C. Americans fear vision loss more than most other conditions, as reported in a 2014 Research!America survey conducted for AEVR. 1 So sustained education about glaucoma is vital since it is the second leading cause of preventable vision loss in the United States. A neurological disease affecting the optic nerve, it causes loss of peripheral vision and ultimately blindness. It affects more than 2.7 million Americans over...

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If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana