research advocacy

Dear Research Advocate, In his inaugural address President Trump spoke of ushering in a “new millennium” to “unlock the mysteries of space, to free the earth from the miseries of disease, and to harness the energies, industries and technologies of tomorrow.” We’re all in on those goals, to be sure. The President has been very active on many of his campaign pledges during his first week in office, but science hasn’t been a driving theme as yet. However, some of his administration’s actions this week have alarmed members of the science community. It is a time for gatherings in our nation’s capital -- for the Inauguration, for and against the anniversary of Roe v. Wade and more. It’s our...
Dear Research Advocate: The Commerce Department'€™s report of the U.S. trade deficit narrowing to its lowest level since October 2009 is welcome news, but the devil is in the details. Despite the economic progress, our trade deficit with China is nearly as large as our overall trade deficit. Put that together with the fact that China is rigorously investing in R&D while our nation stifles it, and you can see the handwriting on the wall. U.S. export capabilities will be stymied while China'€™s are bolstered. It'€™s not a recipe for a strong and stable economy going forward. China is not the only nation steadily increasing investment in R&D, taking a page from what used to be the U.S...
Dear Research Advocate: The Commerce Department’€™s report of the U.S. trade deficit narrowing to its lowest level since October 2009 is welcome news, but the devil is in the details. Despite the economic progress, our trade deficit with China is nearly as large as our overall trade deficit. Put that together with the fact that China is rigorously investing in R&D while our nation stifles it, and you can see the handwriting on the wall. U.S. export capabilities will be stymied while China’€™s are bolstered. It’€™s not a recipe for a strong and stable economy going forward. China is not the only nation steadily increasing investment in R&D, taking a page from what used to be the U.S...
Dear Research Advocate, The President’€™s budget is out and it’€™s a mixed bag. First, the good news. NSF was given a significant funding boost, $593M over 2012 levels, NIH funding was increased by $470M, and AHRQ, via budget trade-offs, looks to have been boosted by $64M. The increases are from FY12 to FY14, since the President’s budget replaces sequestration in a different way than either Congressional body (see more below). The not so good news in the President’s budget is that other health research agencies did not fare well. The CDC budget was cut deeply, especially prevention programs. FDA was essentially flat -funded. And entitlement-reform may pose a challenge to innovation. The...
Parkinson’€™s disease affects millions of people worldwide. Patient advocacy groups like the Parkinson’€™s Disease Fou ndation and the Parkinson’€™s Action Network provide resources to patients and advocacy tools to promote more research on this devastating disease. PDF has a toolkit to empower advocates and patients to spread the word, educate themselves and others and learn more about Parkinson’€™s research funded by PDF. Meanwhile, PAN is urging advocates to contact their representatives in Congress to support a bipartisan effort to increase funding for the National Institutes of Health; you can also plant a virtual tulip in honor of a loved one and make a contribution to PAN in their...
Next Monday, April 8, is the Rally for Medical Research ! Speakers at the rally will include Research!America Chair the Honorable John Edward Porter , Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Ranking Member on the Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations Subcommittee and Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Ranking Member on the House Budget Committee as well as actress and breast cancer survivor Maura Tierney (best known for her roles on NewsRadio & ER ) and many others! If the medical research community advocates hard enough and loud enough, we may be able to turn the tide on cuts to research funding. As recently reported in the Washington Post , sequestration cuts can be countered if we urge policy makers to...
Research!America President and CEO Mary Woolley joins James ’€œJ.P.’€ Paluskiewicz, deputy chief of staff to Rep. Michael Burgess, MD (R-TX); Cynthia Rice, vice president for government relations, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation; Israel Robledo, Parkinson’€™s Action Network Texas state director; and Lisa Shulman, MD, professor of neurology, University of Maryland in a panel discussion about the power of research advocacy. The panel, hosted by Parkinson’€™s Action Network and moderated by PAN CEO and Research!America Board member Amy Comstock Rick, JD, discusses how to be an effective advocate and communicate effectively with congressional staff to achieve your advocacy goal. When...
The Rally for Medical Research will be held on Monday, April 8 at 11:00 a.m. in Washington, DC, on the steps of the Carnegie Library. Join Research!America and more than 100 other organizations to call on our nation’€™s policymakers to make lifesaving medical research a higher national priority. With the support of researchers, patients and advocates, the Rally for Medical Research is a tremendous opportunity to send a powerful, coordinated message to Capitol Hill. If you can’€™t make it to DC for the Rally, you can take specific actions on April 8 such as: Send an email to or call congressional offices, Tweet members of Congress with a message or post on the member’€™s Facebook page, Write...
Scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center , a Research!America member, have successfully treated a handful of leukemia patients with cutting-edge immune cell therapy. This therapy, similar to previous trials at the University of Pennsylvania and the National Cancer Institute, modifies the patient’€™s immune cells so that they recognize and kill the cancer cells. This experimental therapy provides a new avenue of treatment for patients who have undergone all of the traditional treatments like chemotherapy without achieving remission of the cancer. Read more about this exciting breakthrough in this New York Times article . The study’€™s senior author, Michael Sadelain, MD, PhD,...
Everyone understands that it’€™s necessary to take a hard look at the federal budget and cut costs. The problem with the sequestration is that it recklessly cuts every category of spending across the board at a time when we should maintain critical investments that will pay for themselves in the long run. One of my roles at the University of Pittsburgh is to advocate for federal investment in biomedical research through the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which administers grants to scientists around the country. About 80 percent of all funding for medical research in American universities comes from the NIH. One quarter of NIH funding is for research that leads directly and quickly to...

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Sidebar Quote

If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana