research

For every 1,000 babies born in this country, one to two will have hydrocephalus, and over 1 million people in the U.S. currently live with hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within cavities in the brain called ventricles, where there is an imbalance between the amount of CSF that is produced and the rate at which it is absorbed. As CSF builds up, it causes the ventricles to enlarge and the pressure inside the head to increase. There is currently no known way to prevent or cure hydrocephalus and the only treatment option today requires brain surgery. The most common treatment for hydrocephalus—and the most common procedure performed by...
A century of basic scientific research on retroviruses was required for the current advances in cancer and HIV prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and gene therapy to be achieved. Furthermore, our understanding of normal cell growth, human development, genetics, and evolution would be immensely impoverished if it were not for scientists pursuing their curiosity about peculiar animal viruses for over 100 years. Finally, numerous valuable technologies and commercial products have emerged from studies investigating how retroviruses are transmitted. The viruses that are now known as the avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses were discovered in 1908 and 1911. It was remarkable that birds could get...
Vaso-Occlusive Pain Associated with Menstruation in Sickle Cell Disease Over the last 40 years, a major change has occurred in the care for individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) as the life expectancy has increased from the mid-40s to as high as 60 years old. The focus has shifted from decreasing early mortality in childhood and adolescence to improving quality of life for individuals with SCD in the United States. Vaso-occlusive pain remains the hallmark clinical manifestation and leading cause for hospitalization for individuals affected by SCD. Women were found to have higher pain rates when compared to men, particularly during their reproductive years (ages 19-39 years old), in the...
Alzheimer’s disease is the 6 th leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, affecting 11% of the population 65 years and older. Without a treatment or prevention breakthrough, studies estimate there could be as many as 13.5 million Americans living with the disease by 2050 with associated health care costs rising above $1 trillion. However, the research has progressed, as scientists unlock and unveil the secrets of the brain. Recently, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that measures of the tau protein are better markers of the cognitive decline of Alzheimer's than measures of amyloid beta...
Why Research is Needed Now to Stop the Progression of Parkinson’s Disease Not long ago, as I approached middle age, I started feeling like I hit a wall. It didn’t make sense to me. At age 40 I set out on a path to be healthy at age 50, both physically and emotionally. I knew a lot of people who burned out at 50 and I wasn’t going to be one of them. I exercised regularly and ate a healthy diet heavy on fruits and vegetables. I had a strong support network both at home and work. Looking from the outside everything was great – our family was all healthy, our business had recovered from the great recession and everything seemed to be going my way both personally and professionally. Still,...
Despite the tremendous improvements in health we’ve made in the 20th century, Americans live shorter lives and suffer worse health outcomes than people in many other high-income countries. That’s why this week, during National Public Health Week , the American Public Health Association, Research America and hundreds of partners across the country are rallying around a goal of making the U.S. the Healthiest Nation in One Generation — by 2030. We're building a national movement of people, communities and organizations working to ensure conditions where everyone has the opportunity to be healthy. While maintaining a healthy lifestyle and having access to health insurance are critical...
In this new series of videos , we illustrate the urgent need for exploring opportunities to increase scientific understanding of lupus using recommendations from the recently released Action Plan for Lupus Research . The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), released the action plan to identify and examine opportunities to increase scientific understanding of lupus, which will ultimately lead to safer and more effective treatments and, eventually, cures. Lupus is an unpredictable and misunderstood autoimmune disease that ravages different parts of the body. It is difficult to diagnose, hard to live...
More than 1.6 million people developed cancer in the U.S. in 2015, and 1 in 2 men and 1 in 3 women will be diagnosed with cancer over the course of their lives. Cancer also has a major fiscal impact: the economic burden totaled $263.8 billion in 2013, translating to nearly $900 per American. On March 10, 2016, Research!America, in partnership with AcademyHealth, American Cancer Society, and Celgene Corporation convened a panel of cancer experts to discuss how research is working to stop cancer. Dr. Lisa Simpson, president and CEO of AcademyHealth, started the conversation by outlining cancer innovation as a continuum. Basic research provides answers on how living organisms work and what...
The Global Liver Institute is proud to be a member of Research!America as we elevate the nation’s and the global understanding of the need for a more collaborative, coordinated and efficiently-resourced approach to preventing and eliminating liver diseases. Liver diseases currently affect more than half a billion people around the world, primarily forms of viral hepatitis, and cause more deaths annually than HIV, TB, and malaria combined. Despite lack of attention, stigma, persistent myths about the causes of liver disease, and over-representation by multiple vulnerable populations the field of liver disease can and should be highlighted as an innovation success story. Researchers have...
Research conducted at Louisiana institutions benefits not only those in the state but also people across the country, said Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA) during his opening remarks at the Louisiana Research Summit held on February 16 at the University Medical Center in New Orleans. The summit, co-hosted by Research!America, assembled federal, state, university, and business leaders to discuss current challenges and opportunities for advancing research in Louisiana. At several junctures during the summit, Senator Cassidy stressed the importance of making Louisiana "easy to work with" by lowering administrative barriers and building on success to date. He also emphasized that the summit was not...

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