research

By Benjamin Caballero MS, PhD Candidate, Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Although science is perceived to have a fundamental role in addressing major problems of modern society — from climate change to global healthcare — the persistent dwindling of its funding by government agencies is a global trend. It seems that the betterment of humankind is in jeopardy if this trend continues. But who is responsible for this? And more importantly, how can it be changed? During the ’€œResearch Matters Communications Workshop for Early Career Scientists’€ at the George Washington University (GW) on October 9 organized by Research!America, Elsevier...
By Benjamin Caballero MS, PhD Candidate, Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Although science is perceived to have a fundamental role in addressing major problems of modern society — from climate change to global healthcare — the persistent dwindling of its funding by government agencies is a global trend. It seems that the betterment of humankind is in jeopardy if this trend continues. But who is responsible for this? And more importantly, how can it be changed? During the ’€œResearch Matters Communications Workshop for Early Career Scientists’€ at the George Washington University (GW) on October 9 organized by Research!America, Elsevier...
Dear Research Advocate: What does the current political impasse in Washington have in common with deadly or disabling diseases? They will not cure themselves, and the harm escalates until the “patient” gets expert treatment. There is no place for miracle cures or wishful thinking. The solution isn’€™t what a given individual or party wants it to be, it’€™s what solves the problem. Right now, it’€™s by no means clear what or who will solve the problems ’€” which now include the debt ceiling as well as the lack of funding to run the government. Fasten your seat belts for more turbulence between now and October 17th. You may have heard that the House passed a bill yesterday to fund NIH, along...
Dear Research Advocate: What does the current political impasse in Washington have in common with deadly or disabling diseases? They will not cure themselves, and the harm escalates until the “patient” gets expert treatment. There is no place for miracle cures or wishful thinking. The solution isn’€™t what a given individual or party wants it to be, it’€™s what solves the problem. Right now, it’€™s by no means clear what or who will solve the problems ’€” which now include the debt ceiling as well as the lack of funding to run the government. Fasten your seat belts for more turbulence between now and October 17th. You may have heard that the House passed a bill yesterday to fund NIH, along...
We Need to Make that Happen Congress will be making funding decisions for all or part of FY14 in September, and it may also decide whether to eliminate, modify or simply leave in place the annual, arbitrary budget cuts known as sequestration. If we want the federal government to continue to adequately seed the research pipeline so that researchers can find treatments and cures for deadly diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’€™s, Congress needs to hear from us. Now. Tell your representatives in Congress to speak out and fight for the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the other health agencies that spur medical progress and safeguard the health...
We Need to Make that Happen Congress will be making funding decisions for all or part of FY14 in September, and it may also decide whether to eliminate, modify or simply leave in place the annual, arbitrary budget cuts known as sequestration. If we want the federal government to continue to adequately seed the research pipeline so that researchers can find treatments and cures for deadly diseases like cancer and Alzheimer’€™s, Congress needs to hear from us. Now. Tell your representatives in Congress to speak out and fight for the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the other health agencies that spur medical progress and safeguard the health...
Dear Research Advocate: Last week, I wrote about the international trade deficit our country faces. This week, I’€™d like to focus on the budget deficit. From 2003 to 2011, Medicare and Medicaid spending grew 74% while our economy only grew 35%. With that kind of differential, no government can balance its budget. We need research to address disabling and costly illnesses, but that won’t be enough in and of itself to bridge the gap. We also need tax and entitlement reform that preserves needed services, squeezes out waste and inefficiency (by the way, that’€™s why we must also fight to protect health economics research, health services research and other research that optimizes health care...
Dear Research Advocate: Last week, I wrote about the international trade deficit our country faces. This week, I’€™d like to focus on the budget deficit. From 2003 to 2011, Medicare and Medicaid spending grew 74% while our economy only grew 35%. With that kind of differential, no government can balance its budget. We need research to address disabling and costly illnesses, but that won’t be enough in and of itself to bridge the gap. We also need tax and entitlement reform that preserves needed services, squeezes out waste and inefficiency (by the way, that’€™s why we must also fight to protect health economics research, health services research and other research that optimizes health care...
Americans are living longer lives but are spending more years afflicted with major illnesses such as Alzheimer’€™s disease, kidney disease, and mental and behavioral disorders, according to a study published online in the Journal of American Medical Association. Researchers show that the overall population health improved in the U.S. in the last few decades, however, illness and chronic disability now account for nearly half of the country’€™s health burden. The objective of the study was to measure the burden of diseases, injuries and leading risk factors in the U.S. from 1990 to 2010 and to compare these measurements with the 34 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and...
Americans are living longer lives but are spending more years afflicted with major illnesses such as Alzheimer’€™s disease, kidney disease, and mental and behavioral disorders, according to a study published online in the Journal of American Medical Association. Researchers show that the overall population health improved in the U.S. in the last few decades, however, illness and chronic disability now account for nearly half of the country’€™s health burden. The objective of the study was to measure the burden of diseases, injuries and leading risk factors in the U.S. from 1990 to 2010 and to compare these measurements with the 34 countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and...

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