Research!America

Dear Research Advocate: Budget Uncertainty Deepens The House Appropriations Committee has postponed this week’€™s scheduled consideration of the Labor-Health and Human Services (Labor-H) funding measure. A New York Times article indicated that the bill protects NIH funding; but, given how low the overall spending number is for Labor-H, “protected” is most likely interpreted as the NIH being cut less than other agencies, themselves highly valued. The distance between the Senate (passed) and House (estimated) Labor-H appropriations ’€” in excess of 20% ’€” sets the stage for another continuing resolution (CR). What actually does happen next is uncertain, which is why advocacy is essential...
Dear Research Advocate: Budget Uncertainty Deepens The House Appropriations Committee has postponed this week’€™s scheduled consideration of the Labor-Health and Human Services (Labor-H) funding measure. A New York Times article indicated that the bill protects NIH funding; but, given how low the overall spending number is for Labor-H, “protected” is most likely interpreted as the NIH being cut less than other agencies, themselves highly valued. The distance between the Senate (passed) and House (estimated) Labor-H appropriations ’€” in excess of 20% ’€” sets the stage for another continuing resolution (CR). What actually does happen next is uncertain, which is why advocacy is essential...
A Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this month shows a staggering 400% increase in the number of women who died from a prescription painkiller overdose from 1999 to 2010. The rate of men’€™s deaths in that same category, meanwhile, rose 265% ’€” a depressing number in its own right. But the 400% increase in women means that in 2010, according to the CDC’€™s calculations, 6,600 women lost their lives because of a prescription painkiller overdose; that’€™s 18 women every day. That’€™s four times the number of deaths attributed to cocaine and heroin combined. And once every 3 minutes, an ER somewhere in America sees a woman for problems resulting...
A Vital Signs report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention earlier this month shows a staggering 400% increase in the number of women who died from a prescription painkiller overdose from 1999 to 2010. The rate of men’€™s deaths in that same category, meanwhile, rose 265% ’€” a depressing number in its own right. But the 400% increase in women means that in 2010, according to the CDC’€™s calculations, 6,600 women lost their lives because of a prescription painkiller overdose; that’€™s 18 women every day. That’€™s four times the number of deaths attributed to cocaine and heroin combined. And once every 3 minutes, an ER somewhere in America sees a woman for problems resulting...
Dear Research Advocate: Our elected representatives know they must make hard tax and entitlement reform decisions, and, for the sake of the nation, ensure those decisions foster economic growth and societal progress. Part of that equation is federal funding for medical research sufficient to capitalize on unprecedented scientific opportunity and tackle urgent threats like Alzheimer’€™s Disease. As I’€™ve highlighted before, a majority of Americans say they are willing to pay additional taxes ’€” $1 more per week (which amounts to approximately $4.4 billion annually) ’€” if they knew those dollars were funding medical research. The public is on our side with their wallets as well as their...
Dear Research Advocate: Our elected representatives know they must make hard tax and entitlement reform decisions, and, for the sake of the nation, ensure those decisions foster economic growth and societal progress. Part of that equation is federal funding for medical research sufficient to capitalize on unprecedented scientific opportunity and tackle urgent threats like Alzheimer’€™s Disease. As I’€™ve highlighted before, a majority of Americans say they are willing to pay additional taxes ’€” $1 more per week (which amounts to approximately $4.4 billion annually) ’€” if they knew those dollars were funding medical research. The public is on our side with their wallets as well as their...
by Mary Woolley, Research!America President and CEO. This entry was originally posted as a guest contribution to PhRMA’€™s Conversations forum. A shift in attitude among elected officials is necessary if this nation is to succeed in combating disease and stemming the rise of health care costs. Federal funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other agencies that conduct medical and health research has not kept pace with scientific opportunity, jeopardizing our ability to find cures for deadly disease and to maintain our global competitive edge. Medical research has not risen to the upper ranks of our nation’€™s priorities in the halls...
by Mary Woolley, Research!America President and CEO. This entry was originally posted as a guest contribution to PhRMA’€™s Conversations forum. A shift in attitude among elected officials is necessary if this nation is to succeed in combating disease and stemming the rise of health care costs. Federal funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and other agencies that conduct medical and health research has not kept pace with scientific opportunity, jeopardizing our ability to find cures for deadly disease and to maintain our global competitive edge. Medical research has not risen to the upper ranks of our nation’€™s priorities in the halls...
July 9, 2013 The Senate subcommittee markup of the Labor-Health and Human Services-Education FY14 spending bill goes a step in the right direction in softening the blow sequestration has dealt to the hopes and expectations of patients and their families. Sequestration’€™s across-the-board spending cuts have sent no-confidence signals across the full ecosystem of medical research and innovation in the public and private sector. There’€™s a reason that, according to a recent national public opinion poll commissioned by Research!America, nearly half of Americans (48%) do not believe we are making enough progress in medical research in the U.S. This nation can’€™t push ahead forcefully with one...
Spain’€™s economy was harshly affected by the 2008 financial crisis and, later, the eurozone crisis. (Just this week, the country’€™s budget minister said Spain has reached a turning point and may at last be emerging from its financial troubles.) Its efforts to slash government spending left few unaffected, and a recent article by Agence France-Presse detailed the effects on Spanish researchers. The Prince Felipe Research Center, in the coastal city of Valencia, lost around half of its funding from the Spanish government; as a result, it closed half of its 28 labs and let go 114 workers. María Jesus Vicent told the wire service that her lab had made great strides in prostate cancer...

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