science

By Benjamin Caballero MS, PhD Candidate, Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Although science is perceived to have a fundamental role in addressing major problems of modern society — from climate change to global healthcare — the persistent dwindling of its funding by government agencies is a global trend. It seems that the betterment of humankind is in jeopardy if this trend continues. But who is responsible for this? And more importantly, how can it be changed? During the ’€œResearch Matters Communications Workshop for Early Career Scientists’€ at the George Washington University (GW) on October 9 organized by Research!America, Elsevier...
Big Loss for Science Science and Medical Research Impacted by Government Shutdown Last Friday, Research!America President and CEO Mary Woolley was interviewed by Al Jazeera America television news network on the effects of the government shutdown on science and medical research. ’€œScience is 24/7. The government was shutdown but Alzheimer’€™s was not shutdown, cancer wasn’€™t, diabetes wasn’€™t.’€ When asked about the biggest problem about the shutdown for science, Woolley said, ’€œI think it was this dispiriting message that science isn’t prioritized anymore.’€ Watch the full interview here .
Big Loss for Science Science and Medical Research Impacted by Government Shutdown Last Friday, Research!America President and CEO Mary Woolley was interviewed by Al Jazeera America television news network on the effects of the government shutdown on science and medical research. ’€œScience is 24/7. The government was shutdown but Alzheimer’€™s was not shutdown, cancer wasn’€™t, diabetes wasn’€™t.’€ When asked about the biggest problem about the shutdown for science, Woolley said, ’€œI think it was this dispiriting message that science isn’t prioritized anymore.’€ Watch the full interview here .
Research!America’s science communications event, “Research Matters Communications Workshop: Promoting Basic Research in a New Age of Communications: Challenges and Opportunities,” was held October 9 at the Marvin Center on the campus of the George Washington University in Washington, DC. GWU’s vice president for research, Leo Chalupa, PhD (pictured at right), opened the day with remarks that implored the nearly 100 young scientists in attendance to think about their families when they communicate. “Act like your Aunt Harriet is in the audience,” Chalupa said; his welcoming remarks indeed laid the groundwork for the workshop, as Aunt Harriet would be referenced frequently throughout the...
Research!America’s science communications event, “Research Matters Communications Workshop: Promoting Basic Research in a New Age of Communications: Challenges and Opportunities,” was held October 9 at the Marvin Center on the campus of the George Washington University in Washington, DC. GWU’s vice president for research, Leo Chalupa, PhD (pictured at right), opened the day with remarks that implored the nearly 100 young scientists in attendance to think about their families when they communicate. “Act like your Aunt Harriet is in the audience,” Chalupa said; his welcoming remarks indeed laid the groundwork for the workshop, as Aunt Harriet would be referenced frequently throughout the...
Dear Research Advocate: What does the current political impasse in Washington have in common with deadly or disabling diseases? They will not cure themselves, and the harm escalates until the “patient” gets expert treatment. There is no place for miracle cures or wishful thinking. The solution isn’€™t what a given individual or party wants it to be, it’€™s what solves the problem. Right now, it’€™s by no means clear what or who will solve the problems ’€” which now include the debt ceiling as well as the lack of funding to run the government. Fasten your seat belts for more turbulence between now and October 17th. You may have heard that the House passed a bill yesterday to fund NIH, along...
Dear Research Advocate: What does the current political impasse in Washington have in common with deadly or disabling diseases? They will not cure themselves, and the harm escalates until the “patient” gets expert treatment. There is no place for miracle cures or wishful thinking. The solution isn’€™t what a given individual or party wants it to be, it’€™s what solves the problem. Right now, it’€™s by no means clear what or who will solve the problems ’€” which now include the debt ceiling as well as the lack of funding to run the government. Fasten your seat belts for more turbulence between now and October 17th. You may have heard that the House passed a bill yesterday to fund NIH, along...
By Bart Peterson, JD, senior vice president of corporate affairs and communications at Lilly I recently had a wonderful opportunity to address the National Health Research Forum, hosted by Research!America. As you may know, this important forum brings together leaders from the public and private sectors to discuss pressing matters that affect the future of research and development in our country. As I mentioned in my speech, from 2000-2007 I had the honor of serving as the mayor of Indianapolis. Although Indianapolis has a solid economic base, I often wondered how other cities in my home state would fare in the headwinds of diverse economic challenges. Indiana is dotted with cities of fewer...
By Bart Peterson, JD, senior vice president of corporate affairs and communications at Lilly I recently had a wonderful opportunity to address the National Health Research Forum, hosted by Research!America. As you may know, this important forum brings together leaders from the public and private sectors to discuss pressing matters that affect the future of research and development in our country. As I mentioned in my speech, from 2000-2007 I had the honor of serving as the mayor of Indianapolis. Although Indianapolis has a solid economic base, I often wondered how other cities in my home state would fare in the headwinds of diverse economic challenges. Indiana is dotted with cities of fewer...
Dear Research Advocate: Congress is on the brink of forcing a government shutdown on Tuesday, October 1. The implications of a shutdown are being subsumed by coverage of the political theater taking place. That is an injustice to Americans, who will be affected. History is illustrative on this point. During the 1995 and 1996 shutdowns , the NIH turned away new patients at the Clinical Center. Research studies housed at federal institutions ceased for the duration of the shutdown; researchers and leaders of industry, academia as well as in government agencies were unable to plan effectively, wasting time and money; the CDC was forced to stop disease surveillance programs, leaving us...

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Without research, there is no hope.
The Honorable Paul G. Rogers