shutdown

Big Loss for Science Science and Medical Research Impacted by Government Shutdown Last Friday, Research!America President and CEO Mary Woolley was interviewed by Al Jazeera America television news network on the effects of the government shutdown on science and medical research. ’€œScience is 24/7. The government was shutdown but Alzheimer’€™s was not shutdown, cancer wasn’€™t, diabetes wasn’€™t.’€ When asked about the biggest problem about the shutdown for science, Woolley said, ’€œI think it was this dispiriting message that science isn’t prioritized anymore.’€ Watch the full interview here .
Big Loss for Science Science and Medical Research Impacted by Government Shutdown Last Friday, Research!America President and CEO Mary Woolley was interviewed by Al Jazeera America television news network on the effects of the government shutdown on science and medical research. ’€œScience is 24/7. The government was shutdown but Alzheimer’€™s was not shutdown, cancer wasn’€™t, diabetes wasn’€™t.’€ When asked about the biggest problem about the shutdown for science, Woolley said, ’€œI think it was this dispiriting message that science isn’t prioritized anymore.’€ Watch the full interview here .
Research!America’s science communications event, “Research Matters Communications Workshop: Promoting Basic Research in a New Age of Communications: Challenges and Opportunities,” was held October 9 at the Marvin Center on the campus of the George Washington University in Washington, DC. GWU’s vice president for research, Leo Chalupa, PhD (pictured at right), opened the day with remarks that implored the nearly 100 young scientists in attendance to think about their families when they communicate. “Act like your Aunt Harriet is in the audience,” Chalupa said; his welcoming remarks indeed laid the groundwork for the workshop, as Aunt Harriet would be referenced frequently throughout the...
Research!America’s science communications event, “Research Matters Communications Workshop: Promoting Basic Research in a New Age of Communications: Challenges and Opportunities,” was held October 9 at the Marvin Center on the campus of the George Washington University in Washington, DC. GWU’s vice president for research, Leo Chalupa, PhD (pictured at right), opened the day with remarks that implored the nearly 100 young scientists in attendance to think about their families when they communicate. “Act like your Aunt Harriet is in the audience,” Chalupa said; his welcoming remarks indeed laid the groundwork for the workshop, as Aunt Harriet would be referenced frequently throughout the...
Dear Research Advocate: Like most Americans, we are alarmed by the ongoing government shutdown. Since the shutdown began, I have been in Georgia, Massachusetts and Ohio, speaking to business and academic leaders, state and local elected officials, philanthropic leaders, and working scientists. Everyone is outraged! Clearly, biomedical and health research ’€” already compromised via sequestration ’€” is not the only priority placed at risk by the impasse, but it is a critical one. From limiting access to clinical trials to undermining the ability to protect our food supply or investigate disease outbreaks, Americans are put at unnecessary risk when government employees are furloughed. We...
Dear Research Advocate: Like most Americans, we are alarmed by the ongoing government shutdown. Since the shutdown began, I have been in Georgia, Massachusetts and Ohio, speaking to business and academic leaders, state and local elected officials, philanthropic leaders, and working scientists. Everyone is outraged! Clearly, biomedical and health research ’€” already compromised via sequestration ’€” is not the only priority placed at risk by the impasse, but it is a critical one. From limiting access to clinical trials to undermining the ability to protect our food supply or investigate disease outbreaks, Americans are put at unnecessary risk when government employees are furloughed. We...

Sidebar Quote

You can change the image of things to come. But you can’t do it sitting on your hands … The science community should reach out to Congress and build bridges.
The Honorable John E. Porter