As the year comes to an end, let’€™s revisit the top ten most popular Research!America blog posts in 2013 (based on page views) that highlighted the importance of making research for health a higher national priority. We’€™re thankful for our many outstanding guest bloggers including early career scientists, leaders of industry, academia, patient groups and scientific societies who strongly believe in the promise of scientific discovery and medical innovation to build healthier lives. 10) Millennials Move On August 14 : Guest blog post by Tyler Wiechman on why the millennial generation is leaving science, from his personal experience. “If funding was more available for these VITAL research...
By Samantha White, PhD; Research!America Science Policy Fellow Congress recently passed a budget agreement that should provide some temporary relief from the steep cuts of sequestration. Unfortunately, this budget is far from a panacea the damage wrought by the sequester and a decade of stagnant funding to our nations research enterprise. One alarming consequence has been a devastating blow innovative scientific studies to help fight deadly and disabling diseases. During this season of giving, the Appropriations Committee will allocate funding to the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and other scientific agencies. We at Research!America wanted to know what...
A recent Gallup poll shows that Americans have an overall positive opinion of the work being done by two federal health agencies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was given a rating of ’€œgood’€ or ’€œexcellent’€ by 60 percent of respondents. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was given equally positive and fair ratings by 77 percent of those polled. Of the ten agencies listed in the poll, FDA’€™s rating by the public increased the most between 2009 and 2013. Other agencies reviewed in this latest poll include NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Internal Revenue Service which scored low with nearly half (42%) saying the IRS is doing a ’€œpoor...
From left: Karen Goraleski, LeAnne Fox, Kristy Murray, Brian D’€™Cruz, Rachel Cohen, Mark Rosenberg On March 14, Research!America hosted a neglected tropical disease panel at the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) conference, ’€œAre NTDs a Growing Threat? Research, Access and Next Steps.’€ The conversation was moderated by Karen Goraleski, Executive Director of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) and featured the following panelists: Rachel Cohen, Regional Executive Director of the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi); Brian D’€™Cruz, Emergency Physician with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières North America; LeAnne Fox,...
Join Research!America and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network for a pre-SOTU Twitter chat on Monday, February 11, 1 to 2 p.m. ET. Visit @ResearchAmerica and @ACSCAN on Twitter to follow Research!America President Mary Woolley and ACSCAN President Chris Hansen as they discuss important facts about sequestration and answer questions from participants. Use the hashtag #curesnotcuts in your tweets to join the conversation.
Medical research is at risk in our nation. So too is prevention research, as well as the research needed to combat disease outbreaks, weed out costly inefficiencies and deadly errors from our health care system. Sequestration has already resulted in cuts to our federal health agencies; these cuts are on top of deep cuts already made to research. These continued cuts are stalling innovation and economic growth and discouraging the next generation of researchers and patients waiting for cures. If Congress continues to cut core federal functions, compromising our nation’€™s health and science agencies (National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug...
Thanks for stopping by, and welcome to our humble new abode! After years of hosting a blog on our domain, we felt it was time to give our blog a fresh coat of paint and some new appliances. The end result is what you see here, and this will be the home of Research!America’s blog moving forward. Our old blog home will still live on as an archive, as we believe there is plenty of timeless and valuable information there. But we will no longer be adding new posts there. So please, take a look around and help us test the blinds. If you see something that’s not working as it should, please let us know by dropping an email to editor@researchamerica.org . Again, thank you and welcome!

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Funding research gives all of us a better chance of living a healthier life.
Pam Hirata, heart disease survivor