Alzheimer Research Cuts Show Folly of Sequestration

rablogs

This post is an excerpt of a Bloomberg column by Albert R. Hunt  on how sequestration hurts medical research, especially in the fight to better understand’€”and hopefully cure’€” Alzheimer’€™s disease.

albert_hunt

Albert R. Hunt

Many Republicans, and Democrats, never thought the automatic across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration would take effect. After all, they might produce dangerous, if unintended, consequences such as potentially bankrupting the U.S. health-care system, along with millions of families.

Typical Washington hyperbole, right? It actually is happening under sequestration, which kicked in three months ago, a product of America’€™s political dysfunction.

Because the cuts only affect the margins of a wide array of defense and domestic discretionary programs, there mostly hasn’€™t been an immediate pinch; the public backlash has been minimal. The long-term consequences, in more than a few cases, are ominous.

There’€™s no better case study than Alzheimer’€™s disease. With the sequestration-enforced cuts at the National Institutes of Health, research to find a cure or better treatment is slowing.

Alzheimer’€™s, the most common form of dementia, is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. Five million Americans are afflicted with the disease. It costs about $200 billion a year, creating a severe strain for public health care and many families. Then there’€™s the emotional toll: The Alzheimer’€™s Association estimates that caregivers had an additional $9 billion of health-care costs last year.

’€œAs the population lives longer, Alzheimer’€™s is the defining disease of this generation,’€ says Senator Susan Collins, a Maine Republican, who’€™s trying to fight the sequestration restraints and sharply increase spending for research.

The latest annual report on health statistics from the Centers for Disease Control underscores her point. There’€™s been a lot of progress, in large part because of earlier NIH efforts: The number of deaths from strokes and heart disease is down more than 30 percent over the past decade, and cancer deaths have declined almost 15 percent. The reverse has occurred with Alzheimer’€™s. Over a decade, deaths have risen sharply, up 38 percent for males and 41 percent for women.

It’€™s expected to get worse. A report this spring by the nonpartisan RAND Corp estimates that by 2040, the number of Americans afflicted will have doubled, as will the costs. Other experts say that as grave as those projections are, they may be underestimated. The Alzheimer’€™s Association says that under current trends the cost will exceed $1 trillion annually by 2050. That either would bankrupt Medicare and Medicaid or force huge tax increases.

Read the full article here and then join us on Twitter and Facebook to speak up for the importance of medical and health research.

Albert R. Hunt is a Bloomberg View columnist. He was formerly the executive editor of Bloomberg News, directing coverage of the Washington bureau. Hunt hosts the weekly television show “Political Capital with Al Hunt.”

Post ID: 
1079

Comments

These sequestrations are going to have a lasting impact, one that could put medical research back quite a bit. These cuts are also being felt in the field of cancer research. I have heard of a number of promising research projects which will need to be put on hold as a result of this sequestration.

Add comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Adds node titles to internal links found in content (as HTML "title" attribute).
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Luck shouldn't play a role in why I'm alive.
Laurie MacCaskill, a seven-year pancreatic cancer survivor