Dear Research Advocate, The Nobel prize winners announced this week showcase the role of both private sector (William Campbell’s work at Merck) and federal funding (Paul Modrich’s and Aziz Sancar's NIH and NSF grants) in driving scientific progress, and more broadly, the profound return science delivers to our nation and the world. Read our statements on the winners . The next few weeks are crucial for science funding and policies. Congressional leadership is working with the President to arrive at a budget deal that lifts the sequester caps, allowing for increases in NIH and other research agencies. If a deal lifting the caps is not made before Speaker Boehner retires, the new speaker (...
A strong majority of Americans (81%) say medicines available today have improved their quality of life and even more (91%) say it is important to develop better medicines for conditions we currently treat, according to a national public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America. But many respondents say candidates for President and Congress have done a poor job relating to the health expectations of Americans. Less than a quarter of respondents say candidates running for Congress listen to and understand the health concerns of Americans, and one-third say the same for presidential candidates. A majority of African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians and non-Hispanic whites all agree that...
Could a 21 st Century Cures bill that modernizes the research ecosystem cross the finish line in Congress in the near future? We’re moving in the right direction, according to most of the panelists featured in POLITICO Pro’s “How Fast to Cures?” discussion on October 7, 2015 at the Newseum in Washington D.C. “For the first time in decades, with the House bill of 21 st Century Cures and with the Senate companion piece that they are working on, we’re seeing a revving up of our full ecosystem of discovery, development and delivery of medical progress that incorporates the patient community in ways that we’ve never seen,” said Mary Woolley, president and CEO, Research!America. Advocates should...
The October 2015 issue of The Research Advocate is now online . Highlights from this month's issue include: Recap of events in Washington, DC, such as Research!America's National Health Research Forum and the Rally for Medical Research. A federal policy update with details on the budget and appropriations agenda in Congress. A member spotlight featuring the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Information on Research!America's new voter education initiative, Campaign for Cures. Download the entire October 2015 Research Advocate as a PDF .
Dear Research Advocate, It was down to the wire, but Congress passed and the President signed a continuing resolution (CR) yesterday evening to keep the government operating, at least through December 11, 2015. Speaker Boehner’s sudden resignation last Friday came as a shock. But since he has made it clear there is still a lot he’d like to accomplish before he leaves Congress on October 30, hopes have soared in many quarters! He is reportedly working with Leader Pelosi (D-CA-12), Senate leadership and the White House on a longer term budget deal, one that we hope will jettison sequestration. Now is a good time to thank members of Congress for taking action to prevent a shutdown, and urge...
This article appeared on October 1, 2015 in The Huffington Post. “What are those things about breast cancer that keep you up at night?” It’s a question I’m asked frequently in my role as president and CEO of the largest breast cancer organization. And to be honest, there are many things. Among them is a misconception I sometimes hear that because breast cancer still kills, we’ve made no progress over the past three decades. And, because we have so more to do in breast cancer, what science, medicine, technology and a large and dedicated breast cancer community have already accomplished means little. But ask any patient who has another year of life thanks to therapies like Tamoxifen,...

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You can change the image of things to come. But you can’t do it sitting on your hands … The science community should reach out to Congress and build bridges.
The Honorable John E. Porter