Dear Research Advocate: Both the Republican and Democratic platforms highlight the importance of achieving medical progress, responding to the fact that Americans place a high value on achieving health and wellness (see my Huffington Post blog last Friday discussing our newest survey results ). A portion of the first day of the Democratic convention this week was devoted to public health topics, including the opioid abuse crisis . Secretary Clinton chose Senator Tim Kaine as her running mate, a policymaker with a solid track record on public health; a strong proponent of prevention. In Sen. Kaine’s speech last evening, he emphasized the importance of research to defeat Alzheimer’s and...
Dear Research Advocate: The party conventions mark the official start to the general election. In Cleveland we heard rousing daily themes of “Make America (aspirational word) Again”. I kept hoping for “healthy” or “innovative,” aspirations we know rank high with Americans, but that was not to be. Nor -- at least as of this writing -- have any speakers addressed medical progress. Even so, the official Republican platform recognizes the importance of medical research and innovation for our economy and for patients. The Democratic platform , which will be adopted at the DNC convention next week, in fact makes similar points. We’ll see if research and innovation make it into the convention...
Dear Research Advocate: Not surprisingly since it is the last week before an extended recess, Congress has been quite busy. There have been highs, lows and a lot that’s in between. Congress passed the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), but without a dedicated funding stream to jump start progress. The House Appropriations Committee passed an FY17 Labor-H appropriations bill with a robust $1.25 billion increase for NIH and a pledge from Chairman Tom Cole (R-OK) to make this number even higher. However, there was bitter partisan disagreement on restricting CDC gun violence prevention research and how to address the Zika crisis, leading to passage along party lines of a bill that...
The July/August 2016 of The Research Advocate is now online . Highlights from this month include: Announcing a new interactive map and blog as part of the national voter education initiative Campaign for Cures . The user-friendly map of the U.S. features hundreds of quotes on medical progress from candidates across the political spectrum. The Campaign for Cures blog is packed with information related to the election, patient stories, events, and commentary on science, research, and innovation. Registration is now open for the 2016 National Health Research Forum . The event, titled Straight Talk: New Thinking on Tough Challenges , will feature thought-provoking panel discussions on complex...
Dear Research Advocate: Today, the House Labor-HHS appropriations subcommittee marked up its FY17 funding bill, which includes funding for NIH, CDC and AHRQ. NIH received a $1.25 billion increase, $750 million less than the Senate increase. Given the subcommittee’s overall budget allocation ($569 million below fiscal year 2016) and the more conservative funding climate in the House, this is still an extraordinarily positive outcome. At the markup, Chairman Tom Cole (R-OK-04) noted that the $1.25 billion increase set a floor - rather than a ceiling - for NIH funding in FY17, a positive sign for potential negotiations with the Senate later in the process. The House Labor-HHS bill proposes a...

Sidebar Quote

If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana