Saluting Public Health Heroes Who Make America Safer and Healthier On the Monday before Thanksgiving, Research!America and leading public health organizations take time to recognize public health professionals who work tirelessly every day to protect us from disease, injury, and other health threats. From the ordinary to the extraordinary, these heroes keep our drinking water safe, air clean and children healthy. Each week leading up to November 21, Research!America and PHTYD partners are highlighting themes that are important to public health. Click here to visit the 2016 Public Health Thank You Day page for information and ways to get involved.​ To view our list of 2016 partners, click...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday, November 21, 2016. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit www.publichealththankyouday.org for more information. The U.S. is experiencing a shifting landscape of health care and public health. Access to care, quality of care, health care costs, medication adherence, and medication safety are top priorities to patients. Research has shown that, along with medication management, we can look to pharmacists to effectively provide preventive care and follow-up services, helping to address each of these priorities in easily...
Dear Research Advocate: This week, I joined host Alex Philippidis to discuss the challenges the next President will face on Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News’ Sounds of Science podcast. Not only are there policy decisions to be made, but the President’s transition team must also address more than 4,000 political appointments. Conversations are well underway, but it's not too late to suggest outstanding candidates, including people already in the government, perhaps ready for a new role. I encourage you to toss your own hat in the ring as well if you are hearing a call to public service. (Use this guide to learn more about the transition process and this resource to find out who...
What, in y our view, are the major challenges facing our nation’s research enterprise? Biomedical research is the driving force behind decades of advances that have improved the health of people in every corner of America—including the lives of those affected by breast cancer. With a robust and sustained investment in biomedical research, the possibilities would be endless. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and its National Cancer Institute (NCI) have played a role in every major cancer prevention, detection and treatment advance in breast cancer for decades. Within the NIH, the NCI is the principal agency for cancer research and training. The NCI has funded numerous major breast...
The One Health Initiative , which is supported by scientific, health and environmentally related disciplines, represents the future of infectious disease treatment and prevention. As advocates for science and medical innovation, we must recognize the enormous potential that One Health holds and encourage multi-disciplinary thinking and collaboration across the full spectrum of stakeholders to improve public health and security. Many zoonotic diseases -- diseases that are transmissible between animals and humans -- have had profound effects on public health. Ongoing scientific research on a West Nile Virus vaccine, increased understanding of chronic Lyme disease and therapeutic treatments...
This blog post is part of a weekly series focusing on different aspects of public health leading up to Public Health Thank You Day on Monday, November 21, 2016. Join the conversation on social media with the hashtag #PHTYD and visit www.publichealththankyouday.org for more information. While One Health or One Medicine is a relatively new idea, humans have long recognized the connection between animals, humans, the environment and health. Chinese scholars in the last three centuries BCE interpreted the earth and human body as interdependent and that if the land was unhealthy so was the body. Writings from the Hippocratic Corpus (composed between the sixth and fourth century BCE) include...
Dear Research Advocate: The election is only 18 days away, still time for candidates for Congress and President to share details about how they plan to speed medical progress. Use this editable message to reach out. Quoting the sentiment of former HHS Secretary and President Emeritus of Morehouse School of Medicine, Dr. Louis Sullivan, in his recent op-ed on the landscape of science this election cycle: “Let’s hear some specifics!... We’re all ears.” A few days ago I joined ScienceDebate.org, YouTube, the Young Turks and leading science champions in a provocative discussion about the role of science in this year’s elections. Check out A More Scientific Union , on YouTube ( panel 1 , panel 2...
The recent presidential town hall debate didn’t even touch on the critical role science and research play in our nation’s health, security and prosperity. There is one more debate, October 19th, and with the topics already announced , now is the time to suggest questions to moderator Chris Wallace and his Fox producers by tweeting to @FoxNews and @FoxNewsSunday. The list of topics for the debate doesn’t include science in a direct way; however, the economy is on the list, presenting a clear opportunity to ask what each candidate would do to fuel research and innovation in the interest of creating good jobs and driving the economy. In a recent opinion piece , Bill Gates lays out how...
With Election Day a few weeks away, voters still have time to ask presidential and congressional candidates their plans to advance medical and health research. To help ramp up these efforts, Research!America and partners have launched a Campaign for Cures online ad campaign urging voters to ask their candidates for President and Congress their views on medical progress. The ads, which are running during the month of October in key states and in the DC metro area on websites affiliated with CQ Roll Call, are driving visitors to the Campaign for Cures website ( www.campaignforcures.org ). The site features an interactive map with more than 500 candidate quotes on public and private sector...
The October 2016 Research Advocate is now online. Highlights from this month include: Honorees were announced for the 2017 Advocacy Awards. Distinguished leaders in scientific, medical and health research whose accomplishments have led to groundbreaking discoveries and raised public awareness of life-threatening conditions will be recognized at Research!America’s Advocacy Awards Dinner at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C. on March 15, 2017. Research!America's 2016 National Health Research forum featured discussions on a public health emergency fund, prevention and the future of research. View the photoslick for the forum here . A federal policy update including the short-...

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Luck shouldn't play a role in why I'm alive.
Laurie MacCaskill, a seven-year pancreatic cancer survivor