CDC monitoring for stomach bug in United States

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Cyclospora cayetanensis Photo credit: CDC

                                       Cyclospora cayetanensis                                     Photo credit: CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is closely monitoring a new stomach bug that has hit several states. The one-celled parasite known as Cyclospora, which causes diarrhea, stomach cramps and other symptoms normally associated with a viral stomach bug, has sickened hundreds of people across the country.

As of this week, the CDC has been notified of 285 cases of Cyclospora infection in 11 states including Iowa, Nebraska, Texas, Wisconsin, Georgia, Connecticut, New Jersey, Minnesota and Ohio. At least 18 persons reportedly have been hospitalized in three states with most of the illnesses surfacing between mid-June through early July. The cause is not yet clear but health experts say the bug possibly came from contaminated food or water.  The illness doesn’€™t spread from person to person.

CDC is working with state health officials and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate the outbreak. Adequate federal funding is critical to tracking food-borne illnesses and protecting Americans from health threats.  Contact your representatives and urge them to boost funding for the CDC, FDA and other health agencies.

For more information, please visit: http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/cyclosporiasis/outbreaks/investigation-2013.html

Post ID: 
1373

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