International Women’s Day: Women’s health and research in the spotlight

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March 8, International Women’€™s Day, ’€œhas grown to become a global day of recognition and celebration across developed and developing countries alike,’€ reads InternationalWomansDay.com, a global hub for sharing news and resources about the day. While great strides have been made in the past hundred years to improve the health and equality of women in America, there are still areas of medical care and research where women are at risk; these areas represent a great opportunity for America to lead the way in promoting health and equality for women around the world. Some Research!America alliance member organizations work every day to bring increased awareness to health issues affecting women or to advocate for females in research and science careers.

The Society for Women’€™s Health Research (SWHR) is a national non-profit organization that seeks to ’€œbring attention to the myriad of diseases and conditions that affect women uniquely.’€ SWHR has helped make women’€™s health issues a national priority by advocating for greater funding for sex-based biological differences research and legislative and regulatory issues related to women’€™s health, as well as administering public educational campaigns on women’€™s health. WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease is the only national patient-centered organization that focuses exclusively on women’€™s heart disease. The overall mission of WomenHeart is ’€œto improve the health and quality of life of women living with or at risk of heart disease, and to advocate for their benefit.’€

Though the number of women in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) research disciplines is gradually rising, there is still a significant disparity in the ratio of men to women in STEM careers. The Association for Women in Science, or AWIS, advocates for the interests of women in science and technology. AWIS seeks to educate the public about bias against women in STEM careers, the disparities in career advancement and underrepresentation of women in the STEM workforce through publication of fact sheets and advocacy activities.

The U.S. government is committed to improving women’€™s health around the globe. Through policies and programs such as the Global Health Initiative, women’€™s health activities under PEPFAR and an executive order to develop a U.S. strategy to prevent and respond to gender-based violence, the U.S. has made significant investments in women’€™s health. At a recent event about U.S. priorities for women’€™s global health in the president’€™s second term, Kathleen Sebelius, Secretary of Health and Human Services, said ’€œnothing has a greater return than investment in women’€™s health’€ and promised that the U.S. will continue to operate under the ’€œguiding principle that no woman should be denied access to the care she needs for a healthy life for her and her children.’€

Find local International Women’€™s Day events through the InternationalWomansDay.com event calendar.  In the Washington, DC area, look for a launch event for an international network designed to help women grow their careers through mentoring. The United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women, UN Women, will be offering a free webcast of its International Women’€™s Day event at the UN headquarters in New York.

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Funding research gives all of us a better chance of living a healthier life.
Pam Hirata, heart disease survivor