Lives in the Balance

researchamerica

On December 13 and 14, the global health community gathered at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York for a conference called ’€œLives in the Balance: Delivering Medical Innovations for Neglected Patients and Populations.’€ Hosted by Mount Sinai Global Health, Doctors Without Borders (MSF), and Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), the conference aimed to spur innovation for new tools to combat neglected diseases.

Several key themes emerged from the conference. First, there is a ’€˜fatal imbalance’€™ between the burden of neglected disease and medical innovations to combat these illnesses. Neglected diseases affect more than 1.4 billion people worldwide and account for nearly 11% of the global disease burden. In contrast, MSF’€™s Jean-Herve Bradol, MD, pointed out that of 850 new therapeutic products approved in the past decade, only 4.4% were for neglected diseases. Furthermore, only 1.4% of 148,445 clinical trials were for neglected diseases. To solve this problem, many presenters agreed that there must be a new global framework for global health R&D. A new framework would place an emphasis on public financing and some called for all countries to pledge 0.01% GDP to government-funded R&D.

In addition to reforming the global R&D system, several panelists mentioned the importance of improving access. This means not only improving access to medicines among neglected patients but improving information sharing and access to essential compounds among researchers. The idea of access must also be built into the beginning of the research process. For example, considering storage temperatures or dosage early on in the R&D process will help to ensure that the new tools being developed can be easily utilized in the field.

The conference has put a spotlight on the need for more research to combat neglected diseases. Diseases that once only existed in the developing world are becoming an increasingly large threat in Europe and in the U.S. Cases of multi-drug resistant TB are on the rise, and we need much better treatment options to cure patients. Only two drugs are currently available to treat Chagas disease; both were developed more than 35 years ago, have toxic side effects and are not effective in all patients. It is more important than ever before that governments, philanthropic groups and the private sector come together to help reform the global R&D system, improve access and find new tools to help neglected patients and populations around the world. Many have called this time, these partnerships and current innovations in modern science an unprecedented opportunity for neglected disease R&D. Others are frustrated by the seeming regression in global health due to non transformative “stopgap” efforts, citing drug resistant TB as an example. Both may be right. With unified advocacy to raise awareness and engage political and civic will for NTDs, we can successfully channel both the frustration and the opportunity ahead of us.

Post ID: 
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