March 22 is World Water Day

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Nearly 11% of the world’€™s population does not have access to clean drinking water. This represents a tremendous burden on global health, as almost 2 million children die from water-borne illnesses each year. Improvements in sanitation and the availability of clean water are essential to improve health around the world.

America has been a leader in clean water legislation and water-borne disease research. The late Paul G. Rogers, Research!America’€™s former chair, was a key leader in the passage of environmental legislation, including the Safe Drinking Water Act, during his tenure in Congress. Today, American investment in research is providing new therapies and prevention strategies for water-borne illnesses like schistosomiasis and Guinea worm disease, both neglected tropical diseases. Learn more about neglected tropical diseases here.

Here are some interesting facts for World Water Day 2013:

  • Did you know that agriculture accounts for roughly 80%of the world’€™s water consumption?
  • For every $1 invested in water and sanitation, an average of $4 is returned in increased productivity. (Source: WHO, Geneva, 2012: page 4)
  • Every year, around 60 million children in the developing world are born into households without access to sanitation. (UN Water)
  • 443 million school days are lost each year due to water-related diseases.

Visit UN Water’€™s World Water Day site or see a list of UNICEF partner organizations to learn more about water, sanitation and hygiene issues around the world.

Post ID: 
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Luck shouldn't play a role in why I'm alive.
Laurie MacCaskill, a seven-year pancreatic cancer survivor