Nominate a White House Champion of Change for Public Health and Prevention

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Know someone who is doing extraordinary things to improve public health in your community? Nominate them (before Friday, August 9) as a Champion of Change for Prevention and Public Health.

The champion’€™s work may involve:

  • Supporting community and clinical prevention efforts to address chronic disease, increase education and outreach, and integrate primary and behavioral health;
  • Creating healthy and safe communities by promoting healthier schools, homes and workplaces that make the healthy choice the easy choice;
  • Working to address health disparities and empower all Americans to make healthy choices by addressing health concerns that disproportionately affect certain populations;
  • Strengthening public health infrastructure and improving public health’€™s capacity to detect and control disease and other threats;
  • Increasing the uptake of important preventive services; and
  • Promoting tobacco prevention.

’€œWe know that efforts to promote the public’€™s health and prioritize prevention happen in America’€™s towns and cities, in schools and parks, in churches and community centers. Every day, local leaders across America’€™s communities are stepping up in big ways to make sure all Americans have the opportunity to live a healthy life,’€ said Paul Dioguardi, director, Office of Intergovernmental and External Affairs, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in a communication.

Winners will be invited to the White House in September to celebrate their accomplishments and showcase their actions to support healthier communities.

If you have any questions, email ExternalAffairs@hhs.gov.

Post ID: 
1434

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If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana