Report Highlights Need for More R&D Funding for Neglected Diseases

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On December 3, Policy Cures released its fifth annual G-FINDER report, a comprehensive survey of funding for research and development for neglected diseases. The report tracks global public, private and philanthropic investments into R&D for 31 diseases, including HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and NTDs.  In positive news, this year’€™s report shows that total funding has actually increased by $443 million since 2007.

The report demonstrates that government funding, which accounts for over two-thirds of all investment, is increasingly going toward basic academic research, rather than product development. Research!America believes it is vital that the entire research pipeline be fully funded. Basic research will help us understand the best ways to tackle these neglected diseases and give us a better understanding of disease and the human body.  However, we also need robust funding for the development of urgently needed tools like drugs, vaccines and diagnostics. This urgency is worsened by the fact that private and philanthropic investments in product development for NTDs have also decreased.

Because NTDs disproportionately affect the ’€œbottom billion’€ or individuals earning less than $1.25 per day, there is essentially no market demand for new NTD tools, so the private sector is unlikely to fund these projects. Dr. Moran, director of Policy Cures, believes that governments must step up to the plate, saying that ’€œif [governments] want products for neglected diseases, they must fund product development as well as basic research.’€

-Morgan McCloskey, global health intern

Post ID: 
367

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Without research, there is no hope.
The Honorable Paul G. Rogers