Teams Compete for Big Data Prize

Izzy Okparanta

Six science-savvy teams comprised of researchers from around the globe are currently in the running for a grand prize of $230,000 to develop new big data methods for advancing biomedical research.

The two-phased Open Science Prize contest was made possible through a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Wellcome Trust and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. During the first phase, the teams received prize money to help create tools or services that could be used to tackle important issues in biomedicine and improve health. They designed prototypes to address subjects such as neuroimaging, rare diseases, mental and neurological diseases, pathogen surveillance and FDA drug approval. They then presented their prototypes at the December 1 Open Data Science Symposium for expert guests, including NIH Director Francis Collins.

During the  second phase of the competition,  the public can select the top three teams — in order of preference — by visiting the Open Science Prize website. Voting ends at 11:59 p.m. PST on January 6. Once the top three teams are selected, a panel of expert advisors will decide who takes home the final prize to be announced in March 2017.

To learn more about the six teams and vote, visit https://www.openscienceprize.org/. To view a taping of their presentations at the Open Data Science Symposium, visit http://bit.ly/OpenSciSymposium

Izzy Okparanta is the Senior Communications Specialist at Research!America.

Add comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Adds node titles to internal links found in content (as HTML "title" attribute).
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana