A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: Snow — not the debt limit — shuts down the government

researchamerica

Dear Research Advocate,

Ironically, the government is closed down today. But that’€™s due to a major snowstorm, not because of failure to agree on increasing the debt limit! Agreeing to increase the debt limit is an encouraging sign that this Congress, weighed down as it is by ideological and political differences, and with record- low approval rankings from the public, can get its job done! Our job is to be sure research is a top priority in this election year ’€” spoken of with conviction by all candidates and by the media and others who influence them.

Standing tall among Members of Congress who champion science are the Chair and Ranking Member of the House Appropriations’€™ Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies subcommittee, Rep. Frank R. Wolf (R-VA-10) and Rep. Chaka Fattah (D-PA-02). At our upcoming March 12 Advocacy Awards dinner, Research!America will honor Reps. Wolf and Fattah with the Edwin C. Whitehead Award for Medical Research Advocacy, saluting their tireless efforts to champion policies that promote federal and private sector medical research and innovation. Be sure to join us!

Robert Samuelson observes in The Washington Post that Congress, whether by action or inaction, is making too many decisions ’€œon the sly,’€ without real public awareness or comprehension. Samuelson says that in so doing Congress is compromising priorities like defense and medical research while simultaneously failing to address tax and entitlement reform. I think it is telling that he chose to identify the loss of purchasing power by the NIH as one of three critical problems created as our elected representatives fail to find a clear path through the ideological storm. One of these days they will make those major decisions, and that’s when it will pay off that research has been well-positioned as a top national priority. We must continue to make the case and make it forcefully.

Even as we work to keep our issue in the forefront of big-picture policy change, we must at the same time make our case via the appropriations process, which is proceeding, for the first time in years, according to ’€˜regular order.’€™ Right now, in FY14, funding for NIH is lower than in FY12 (and in constant dollars is lower than FY03!) ’€” a shortfall that makes absolutely no sense if the goal is to serve the best interests of America and Americans. Other science agencies are underfunded as well, and the policy environment for private sector research and innovation is not compatible with our nation’€™s goals of global leadership. As you prepare to pound the pavement and take to social media to make the case to appropriators for research, take inspiration and new data from the following:

And this: According to the National Retail Federation, Americans are expected to spend $17.3 billion in celebration of Valentine’€™s Day. That amount would fund the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute for more than five years! We are a wealthy nation; we can well afford to spend more on the future of health than we currently are.

Sincerely,

Mary Woolley

Post ID: 
1855

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Funding research gives all of us a better chance of living a healthier life.
Pam Hirata, heart disease survivor