A Weekly Advocacy Message from Mary Woolley: We’re all in this together

researchamerica

Dear Research Advocate:

Fostering research and innovation has long been a multi-pronged effort ’€” government, industry, academia, patients and patient organizations, foundations, and individual philanthropists ’€” all working to advance research. The current interest shown by private philanthropists in advancing science is an echo of a phenomenon witnessed a century ago ’€” and a sign of the opportunity available in some way to all of us to accelerate medical progress and maintain our nation’€™s competitive edge. As reported in a recent front page New York Times article, private donors are stepping up in a big way at a time when scientific opportunity has never been greater. But it is worth noting that even as philanthropic spending is surging, and while it has historically been an important, often energizing component of U.S. leadership in science, the most robust philanthropic support imaginable would still not be sufficient ’€” nor is it intended to ’€” replace federal support.

In tracking medical R&D spending across all sectors over time, Research!America’€™s annual investment reports not only support the NYT finding that philanthropic spending is growing, but place that spending in perspective. For example, in 2011, NIH spending dwarfed medical- and health-related philanthropic research spending by nearly $29 billion. That does not mean philanthropic giving isn’€™t important; rather, it demonstrates that the magnitude of funding needed to drive medical progress is too large to rely on individual or foundation giving. Public and industry dollars are quite simply indispensable to the research pipeline. We call on every sector, every individual (including you billionaires out there!) to step up and increase support. We urge you to fund basic as well as translational research, to identify new approaches and new partnerships, to show us all how to take risks and demand accountability, and to work with and for the overall research enterprise. And ’€” perhaps most important of all ’€” commit to giving confidence to young scientists that their work is valued and will be sustained.

There’€™s no question about it: We all play a role in achieving better health and quality of life, very much including those who volunteer to participate in clinical trials. We are proud to spread the word about a new campaign initiated by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) and the National Minority Quality Forum (NMQF). The ’€œI’€™m In’€ campaign aims to increase diversity in clinical trials and give patients the opportunity to connect with trials in their communities. Research!America polling shows that while Americans are interested in clinical trials, levels of participation are low, especially among African-American, Asian and Hispanic populations. Advancing medical progress means participating! Our newly released America Speaks, Volume 14 poll data summary booklet includes relevant information on public attitudes about clinical trials.

One time-sensitive way you can exercise your responsibility for advancing medical progress is by asking your representatives in Washington to join the chorus of legislators who support strong, continued funding for research. Members of the House and Senate have the opportunity to share their priorities with the appropriations committees until April 4. Send a note to your representatives urging them to submit appropriations requests that support robust medical research funding in FY15.

Finally, I encourage you to review our just-released 2013 Annual Report, which thanks all our members and supporters ’€” you! ’€” for working with us to inform and engage policy makers, media and the public.

Sincerely,

Mary Woolley

Post ID: 
1928

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The capabilities are enormous, a little bit of research can pay off quite a bit in the long run.
Paul D’ Addario, retinitis pigmentosa patient