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Research!America is dedicated to ensuring a strong public and private sector investment in research to improve health at a level warranted by scientific opportunity and supported by public opinion. Each blog post aims to inform readers about the health and economic benefits of research.  

Recent Blog Posts

Dear Research Advocate: Both the Republican and Democratic platforms highlight the importance of achieving medical progress, responding to the fact that Americans place a high value on achieving health and wellness (see my Huffington Post blog last Friday discussing our newest survey results ). A portion of the first day of the Democratic convention this week was devoted to public health topics, including the opioid abuse crisis . Secretary Clinton chose Senator Tim Kaine as her running mate, a policymaker with a solid track record on public health; a strong proponent of prevention. In Sen. Kaine’s speech last evening, he emphasized the importance of research to defeat Alzheimer’s and...
Dear Research Advocate: The party conventions mark the official start to the general election. In Cleveland we heard rousing daily themes of “Make America (aspirational word) Again”. I kept hoping for “healthy” or “innovative,” aspirations we know rank high with Americans, but that was not to be. Nor -- at least as of this writing -- have any speakers addressed medical progress. Even so, the official Republican platform recognizes the importance of medical research and innovation for our economy and for patients. The Democratic platform , which will be adopted at the DNC convention next week, in fact makes similar points. We’ll see if research and innovation make it into the convention...
Dear Research Advocate: Not surprisingly since it is the last week before an extended recess, Congress has been quite busy. There have been highs, lows and a lot that’s in between. Congress passed the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), but without a dedicated funding stream to jump start progress. The House Appropriations Committee passed an FY17 Labor-H appropriations bill with a robust $1.25 billion increase for NIH and a pledge from Chairman Tom Cole (R-OK) to make this number even higher. However, there was bitter partisan disagreement on restricting CDC gun violence prevention research and how to address the Zika crisis, leading to passage along party lines of a bill that...
The July/August 2016 of The Research Advocate is now online . Highlights from this month include: Announcing a new interactive map and blog as part of the national voter education initiative Campaign for Cures . The user-friendly map of the U.S. features hundreds of quotes on medical progress from candidates across the political spectrum. The Campaign for Cures blog is packed with information related to the election, patient stories, events, and commentary on science, research, and innovation. Registration is now open for the 2016 National Health Research Forum . The event, titled Straight Talk: New Thinking on Tough Challenges , will feature thought-provoking panel discussions on complex...
Dear Research Advocate: Today, the House Labor-HHS appropriations subcommittee marked up its FY17 funding bill, which includes funding for NIH, CDC and AHRQ. NIH received a $1.25 billion increase, $750 million less than the Senate increase. Given the subcommittee’s overall budget allocation ($569 million below fiscal year 2016) and the more conservative funding climate in the House, this is still an extraordinarily positive outcome. At the markup, Chairman Tom Cole (R-OK-04) noted that the $1.25 billion increase set a floor - rather than a ceiling - for NIH funding in FY17, a positive sign for potential negotiations with the Senate later in the process. The House Labor-HHS bill proposes a...
Dear Research Advocate: The Cancer Moonshot took some exciting steps forward during a day of action that engaged more than 6,000 individuals across the nation. As Greg Simon, the executive director of the Moonshot taskforce, framed it, the moonshot is designed to “invoke systems change in the way we approach cancer.” Pursuing the goal of faster progress from a systems perspective is important, not only because it has led to promising new cross-sector, cross-functional collaborations (e.g. an Oncology Center of Excellence at FDA, new public-private partnerships), but because it may help seed a much needed change in mindset among policymakers committed to faster medical progress. There is a...
Research!America today unveiled the Campaign for Cures 2016 election blog and an online interactive map . The interactive map features hundreds of quotes from candidates across the political spectrum related to public and private sector research and innovation. The blog, managed by former USA Today senior editor and health reporter Janice Lloyd, features election news, survey data, commentary and analysis of presidential and congressional races in key states on topics relevant to medical progress. The map and blog are the latest resources for voters as part of Campaign for Cures: Vote for Medical Progress , a national voter education initiative supported by Research!America and partner...
After 27 years in Old Town Alexandria, we are relocating to the Crystal City neighborhood of Arlington, VA -- right above the Metro and one stop from Reagan National Airport. Beginning June 27, Research!America's new address is: 241 18th Street South, Suite 501 Arlington, VA 22202 Our phone numbers remain the same. There may be an interruption in phone service during the move. We thank you for your understanding if there are any delays in returning phone calls or emails during June 24-27.
Dear Research Advocate: If you’ve read Ron Chernow’s “Hamilton,” you know that the partisan stand-off we are witnessing in the House, and more broadly across the nation, is not new. Chernow reminds us that political parties -- not originally foreseen by the Founding Fathers -- grew out of intense and often ugly disagreements between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson during the second administration of George Washington. That insight doesn’t make this week’s turn of events less dramatic, but it does offer perspective. In the midst of the Democratic sit-in on preventing gun violence, the House adjourned earlier than expected and won’t resume business until July 5. Just before adjourning...
Dear Research Advocate: As we grieve the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the spectre of more to come is deeply troubling. If there were ever a time for action by our elected officials, surely this is it. Yesterday, Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) took to the Senate floor in a nearly 15 hour filibuster to demand action on gun reform, which ended in Republican leadership agreeing to a vote on two pieces of legislation related to gun sales. Senator Murphy was joined by many of his colleagues, including Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL), who said that the American Medical Association’s declaration of gun violence as a public health crisis is “historic,” entering their press release into the record...

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The capabilities are enormous, a little bit of research can pay off quite a bit in the long run.
Paul D’ Addario, retinitis pigmentosa patient