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Research!America is dedicated to ensuring a strong public and private sector investment in research to improve health at a level warranted by scientific opportunity and supported by public opinion. Each blog post aims to inform readers about the health and economic benefits of research.  

Recent Blog Posts

“Research led by nurses plays a vital role in integrating patient, provider, and system level interventions that improve care and outcomes for vulnerable and underserved populations,” said Martha N. Hill, RN, Ph.D. , Dean Emerita and Professor of Nursing, Medicine, and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University and Research!America board member. “They are on the frontlines of cutting-edge research aimed at tackling chronic health conditions and psycho-sociodemographic threats to improve quality of life for all Americans.” "Now more than ever, the world needs confident, competent and credentialed nurses to improve patient outcomes," said Patricia Davidson, Ph.D., MEd., RN, FAAN , dean of...
Dear Research Advocate, I’m sure you’ve heard that the House passed an ACA replacement bill today. In addition to the significant implications for health care access, the bill would repeal the medical device tax and, tragically, eliminate the Prevention and Public Health Fund. As written, this bill likely cannot pass the Senate. Beyond that, the only bet I would take when it comes to repeal/replace is that there are no safe bets... On to research funding: After months and months of hard work by Congress and advocates, an FY17 appropriations deal providing a $2 billion increase for NIH and modest increases for NSF and FDA is on track to become law. While the news is not 100% positive (e.g...
The University of Michigan School of Nursing (UMSN) is a research-intensive school and our scientists investigate diverse topics that have tremendous implications for patients. In the past year, we submitted 140 grant applications to federal agencies, foundations, and internal funding sources. Our success rate across agencies averages around 33%, well beyond the 5-15% rate seen among the various NIH institutes. We increased our funding by almost three million dollars this year and have a total research funding level of 47 million dollars. But beyond the facts and figures of funding is the impact of our research. We have projects that challenge stereotypes about the role of nursing while...
Seven years ago, I moved to Baltimore to begin my neuroscience Ph.D. studies at Johns Hopkins University, conducting science research funded by the NIH and NSF on how brain cells form connections with one another. These networks of cells are thought to be the basis of memory, and improper network formation could lead to cognitive disorders. We have utilized our knowledge of these mechanisms to diagnose and treat a variety of disorders caused by faulty cell-to-cell connections. As a student, I also found a passion in advocating for science. To improve my own communication skills, I founded Project Bridge, a student-led organization to foster public interest in science research by connecting...
Less than 20% of African-Americans, Hispanics and Asians in the U.S. say they or a family member have ever participated in clinical trials, according to a survey commissioned by Research!America. This lack of inclusion of minority patients can negatively impact the quality of care provided to these patients and ultimately contribute to health disparities. Oftentimes, much of the data supporting approval of new drugs in America is based on clinical trials in non-U.S. populations that poorly reflect American diversity. The lack of U.S. data is, in large part, due to the “difficulty” in recruiting American patients to clinical trials, and represents a barrier to precision medicine. Project...
In a Q&A with Research!America, Kathleen Brady, M.D., Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor, Vice President for Research, and Director of South Carolina Clinical and Translational Research Institute, discusses the relationship between stress and addiction, the rise in opioid abuse, and the role research must play in addressing chronic pain and substance use disorders. This Q&A accompanies two new factsheets, Pain and Substance Use Disorder . What is the focus of your current research? My particular group is very interested in the connection between stress-- stressful life events, early life stressors, and then immediate day-to-day stress—and drug abuse. We are discovering some...
Dear Research Advocate, Last weekend’s March for Science truly was a celebration and a success. That so many passionate advocates participated -- hundreds of thousands in cities across the globe (some in the pouring rain) -- was awe-inspiring. Following the March, Research!America signed onto a community statement that gives voice to the importance of continued civic engagement by scientists and our commitment to fostering that engagement. At the D.C. March, we were thrilled to see two Research!America board members, APHA executive director, Dr. Georges Benjamin, and AAAS CEO and former Congressman, Dr. Rush Holt, among the speakers, and our video up on the jumbotrons. Some Research!America...
The gloomy day and rain may have stopped some people from going out and marching for science on April 22, but not me. I was ready to march along the National Mall in Washington D.C., come rain or shine. To me, the march signified the importance of science in our society from fundamental research in biology to technological advances that keep people alive. I also marched for Research!America, a nonprofit advocacy alliance working to make research for health a higher national priority. As a science policy intern at Research!America, and a researcher, I understand how critical federal funding is for research and innovation. Federal funding for scientific research hits home for me. The National...
The March for Science was a resounding success; not only in the nation’s capital but across the country and the world at numerous satellite marches. I was proud to participate in Salt Lake City’s March for Science on a beautiful April 22nd. Hundreds of people, families and friends, gathered at City Creek Park at the foot of Salt Lake’s Capitol Hill to celebrate the value that science delivers to our communities. Many marchers brought home-made signs reiterating the March’s core aims to promote “Science, not Silence,” emphasizing “Research = Hope,” and reminding us that many of the staples of our lives and health, from beer to vaccines, are brought to us thanks to Science. Marchers carried a...
The March for Science on April 22 in Washington, D.C. and cities across the country and abroad celebrated the countless ways science touches society and improves lives. Science has fostered many societal advances ranging from the eradication of polio to cutting-edge data technology to water quality improvements. We encourage everyone who cares about our scientific enterprise to call on policymakers to enact funding and policies to support public and private sector research. "Medical research and innovation has strong congressional bipartisan support which is a very positive sign for our research ecosystem. We strongly believe the March will further motivate scientists to engage with the...

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Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed.
Abraham Lincoln