antibiotic resistance

Research!America member FASEB (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) kicked off their NSF Matters campaign with a briefing highlighting NSF-funded research tackling antimicrobial resistance. Antibiotic-resistant infections, driven by overuse of antibiotics in clinical and agricultural settings, are on the rise, began the briefing’s first panelist, Dr. Paul Turner , Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University . His work focuses on a new, non-antibiotic approach to treating bacterial infections: viruses. Bacteriophages (simply referred to as phages) are viruses that infect and kill bacteria. The phage Turner works with attacks bacteria via their...
Antibiotic resistance (also known as anti-microbial resistance, or AMR) is a growing public health threat. In a recent national opinion survey , over 80% of Americans said they are concerned that antibiotic resistance will make infections more difficult or impossible to treat, and could even become deadly. However, when it comes to the details, survey data indicated that few are aware of what can be done to slow the progression of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, in honor of Antibiotics Awareness Week, Research!America hosted a guest blog series to highlight the work of some amazing initiatives that are leading the crusade against anti-microbial resistance. To provide the academic...
Dear Research Advocate: Earlier this week I had the privilege of meeting with and addressing faculty and students at Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences and at Rutgers University. During both trips, it was truly energizing to witness the enthusiasm, and sense of accountability, more and more scientists (on every rung of the career ladder) have for influencing the direction of federal research funding and policy. I hope my presentations reinforced and bolstered those terrific instincts...at least that was the goal! As always, I learned easily as much as I shared, including being introduced to an innovative science communication course Rutgers has shaped for doctoral students...
This is the fourth installment in a blog series about awareness of antibacterial resistance in recognition of World Antibiotic Awareness Week, November 12-18, 2018. Check back for more blog posts soon! Which of our interventions, devices, and cures could save lives from antimicrobial resistance (AMR)? What roadblocks are keeping us from making the next groundbreaking discovery to combat AMR? What investments would stop its spread? Over the next year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), along with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is asking leaders around the world to commit to action in one of these areas and join The AMR Challenge . We need your help...
Nearly two thirds of Americans (65%) say antibiotic resistance is a public health problem and a strong majority (81%) say they are concerned that antibiotic resistance will make more infections difficult or impossible to treat and even deadly, according to a national public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America in collaboration with the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA). The survey was supported in part by Pfizer Inc. Majorities across the political spectrum say the federal government should increase funding for research and public health initiatives to address antibiotic resistance – specifically 81% of Democrats, 76% of Republicans and 70% of Independents. “Americans...
This is the third installment in a blog series about awareness of antibacterial resistance that will lead to World Antibiotic Awareness Week, November 12-18, 2018. Check back for more blog posts throughout the coming weeks! In recent news reports, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and resulting serious infections have been linked to hamburger meat, sink traps , and even puppies . The question of whether a patient in the hospital or a person in the community will encounter these dangerous pathogens appears to be moving instead towards how to identify, prevent, and contain once an infection is contracted. The foundation of infection prevention and control is rooted in evidence-based guidelines...
This is the second installment in a blog series about awareness of antibacterial resistance that will lead to World Antibiotic Awareness Week, November 12-18, 2018. Check back for more blog posts throughout the coming weeks! Antibiotics are rarely heralded as medical innovations in news headlines. However, the reality is that antibiotics have represented the hidden backbone of modern medicine for several decades – enabling physicians to perform complex surgeries, and curing infections that were once considered life-threatening. Alarmingly, the future of antibiotics is now under threat due to the rise of antimicrobial resistance, or AMR. AMR refers to the process by which microbes mutate and...
This is the first installment in a blog series about awareness of antibacterial resistance that will lead to World Antibiotic Awareness Week, November 12-18, 2018. Check back for more blog posts throughout the coming weeks! When antibiotics were introduced as a medicine in the 1940s , they changed the face of medicine. The drugs quickly became the cornerstone of modern medicine. In a pre-antibiotic world, even a simple cut to the knee could kill if it became infected, as we had no reliable tools to kill bacteria. Antibiotics allowed thousands of soldiers from World War II to come home because their infections from the battlefield could be treated. By contrast, during World War I, one out of...
For athletes and spectators who are attending the Olympic Games this month, the threat of deadly antibiotic resistant bacteria is all too real. Recently the “bad bug” carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumonia (KPC) was discovered in the waters off several beaches of Rio, where rowing, canoeing and swimming events are scheduled to occur. KPC is one example of antibiotic resistant bacteria, which already sicken at least two million Americans every year. If people visiting Rio for the Olympics become infected with KPC, they may bring it back home, quickly spreading this dangerous bacterium around the world. Without support for new antibiotic R&D, such as the 21 st Century Cures Act,...
Dear Research Advocate: World-class athletes are getting ready to go for the gold in Rio. No one is going for copper, but researchers have found that in healthcare settings, this mineral is a champion when it comes to reducing the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria (one of several public health threats that has received attention in the run-up to the Games). If you are looking for an example of the return on research, this article about the role of copper in reducing hospital associated infections provides an excellent one. Years of investment in research, from discovery science through to trials, can and will pay off for the public with every expectation of many more lives saved in...

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