awareness

Ten million men and 20 million women will struggle with an eating disorder at some point in their lives. These illnesses affect all kinds of people – regardless of gender, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, or background. And despite the fact that these illnesses have the highest mortality rate of any mental disorder, the majority of those affected will not get the help that they need and many will suffer in silence, often not even realizing that they are struggling with an eating disorder. The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) is the leading U.S. non-profit organization supporting individuals and families affected by eating disorders. NEDA serves as a catalyst for prevention...
This article appeared on October 1, 2015 in The Huffington Post. “What are those things about breast cancer that keep you up at night?” It’s a question I’m asked frequently in my role as president and CEO of the largest breast cancer organization. And to be honest, there are many things. Among them is a misconception I sometimes hear that because breast cancer still kills, we’ve made no progress over the past three decades. And, because we have so more to do in breast cancer, what science, medicine, technology and a large and dedicated breast cancer community have already accomplished means little. But ask any patient who has another year of life thanks to therapies like Tamoxifen,...
Hardly anyone knew that 28-year-old Monique Gore-Massy was sick on her wedding day in 2008, but just two months earlier, she had been diagnosed with lupus. Before then, Monique had been coping with symptoms such as fever, chronic body pain, swelling of her joints, hair loss, shortness of breath and mouth sores without understanding why. First she was prescribed antibiotics and then told she was suffering from a viral infection. After nearly a year of confusion and misdiagnosis, Monique was finally diagnosed with lupus. Unfortunately, Monique’s experience is all too common. A recent study found that a majority of people with lupus surveyed (63 percent) reported being incorrectly diagnosed...