basic research

Dear Research Advocate, Last week, we asked you to weigh in with House leadership to bring up key research legislation for a vote. Good news! The National Science Foundation for the Future Act ( H.R.2225 ) and Department of Energy Science for the Future Act ( H.R.3593 ) were both passed this week. Part of what President Biden calls a “once in a generation” investment, these bills put forth important policies and authorize new funding levels designed to drive faster innovation in science and technology at NSF and DOE. The House bills are expected to be conferenced with the Senate-passed United States Innovation and Competition Act ( S.1260 ). The Science and Technology Action Committee,...
According to a public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America Americans largely trust the work done by our nation’s scientists. Seven in 10 Americans believe that the work scientists do benefits all or most people in the United States and more than 80% believe that the work scientists do benefits them personally. Research institutions are among those that inspire the highest confidence, along with military, police, and small businesses. Doctors, nurses, scientists, and public health officials took the top four spots for professionals whom Americans feel confident will act in their best interest. More than ever, Americans recognize the importance of basic research in advancing...
Dear Research Advocate, This Thanksgiving will be challenging – there is no way around it – but giving thanks right now is especially appropriate. Medical and public health personnel, academic and industry researchers, and a plethora of other COVID-19 responders have put the interests of the public ahead of their own, working in high-risk settings, 24-7, to navigate an end to this brutal pandemic. And end it, we will. To help speed the day, elected officials must do their part. Unfinished Business: Unfortunately, we cannot yet thank federal policymakers for meeting two COVID-19-related imperatives: completing the FY21 appropriations process to unstick government functions basic to the...
Being in the middle of a global pandemic feels unsettling and frightening. Part of that fear is rooted in the unknown, because we still have many unanswered questions: fundamental information researchers don’t know about the coronavirus and how viruses like it will act in the future. At the moment, we’re rightly focused on urgent issues such as securing personal protective equipment and ventilators. But we need more research, because to win the battle we need to understand our enemy so that better diagnosis, treatment, and prevention will become a reality. As I wrote recently in USA Today , “Rarely in recent memory has it been this difficult to see beyond the next day. ... But that is...
On April 22, I will be at the March for Science Los Angeles, engaging with fellow scientists and advocates as a biochemist and communications intern with Research!America, a nonprofit advocacy alliance, to raise awareness about the important and exciting biomedical research taking place across the country and the need for increased federal funding. The march is a celebration of the countless ways in which research and innovation impacts society and touches our daily lives. As a graduate student in biochemistry, I conducted federally-funded research at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, studying component parts to recreate the molecular machines that are at work inside our...
A century of basic scientific research on retroviruses was required for the current advances in cancer and HIV prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and gene therapy to be achieved. Furthermore, our understanding of normal cell growth, human development, genetics, and evolution would be immensely impoverished if it were not for scientists pursuing their curiosity about peculiar animal viruses for over 100 years. Finally, numerous valuable technologies and commercial products have emerged from studies investigating how retroviruses are transmitted. The viruses that are now known as the avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses were discovered in 1908 and 1911. It was remarkable that birds could get...
Dear Research Advocate: The short answer to what defense and public health have in common is that they are critical long-term investments for the nation. We have been hearing a lot of talk about funding increased investment in defense by taking it "off budget," and now former House Majority Leader, Eric Cantor, is calling for the same approach for investment in research. Cantor made the case today in the Huffington Post for increasing non-defense discretionary spending, specifically by increasing scientific and medical research, citing the “stimulative” economic power of innovation and basic research. Former Majority Leader Cantor’s call may resonate particularly strongly in the current...
Transforming the current disease-specific non-profit funding model and the outlook for FY16 budget levels for research were among the topics addressed by Alex Silver, chairman and co-founder of EB Research Partnership and Representative Chris Van Hollen (MD-08) at Research!America’s Annual Members meeting held at the Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C. on March 11. Silver became an advocate for research after learning that his son Jackson, who is now seven years old, was diagnosed with a severe form of Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB), a debilitating and potentially deadly genetic condition that causes internal and external blisters all over the body causing constant pain. In addition to...
From advances in diabetes research to record approval of drugs to treat rare diseases , taxpayer funded research and the effective employment of regulatory tools played a significant role in improving the health and wellbeing of Americans in 2014. Below is a year-end roundup of research highlights and scientific achievements from the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Science Foundation, Food and Drug Administration and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. NIH 2014 Research Highlights CDC Year in Review: Mission Critical NSF Discoveries FDA 2014 Drug Approvals: Speeding Novel Drugs to Patients Who Need Them AHRQ 2014 Impact Case...
Dear Research Advocate: People everywhere are captivated by the world-class athletes competing at the Winter Olympics. The personal commitment, dedication and motivation on display is certainly an essential ingredient for medalling, but it is not sufficient: Each nation fielding a team must commit to supporting sustained excellence. And both the public and private sectors play a role. There are some interesting parallels to science and innovation ’€” we don’€™t see it in the public eye every day but when it comes to the fore, it’€™s the kind of success that affirms the human spirit in a compelling way. When lives are saved with a new therapy or new vaccine, we all take heart and we...

Pages

Sidebar Quote

If concerted, long-term investments in research are not made, America will lose an entire generation of young scientists.
Brenda Canine, PhD; McLaughlin Research Institute, Montana